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Tutorial on DVD copy and edit

This discussion thread has 5 messages.

#1
I am really confused by all the formats and intricacies in editing, burning and viewing DVDs. Is there a good tutorial regarding all of this?
For example, someone sent me a DVD (content from a video cam). It has 2 files, each play well on my computer and TV. One file is MTS and the other one on the same disk(!) is AVI. Why would they be different when they deliver the same? Then there are DVDs that have Audio_TS and Video_TS. Then I read about MP4, VS, MPEG, etc. It is enough to blow my mind!
My main object is to put a DVD, (perhaps copied from my TV) in my computer (windows 8), get it on the hard drive edit it, and then burn a clean copy that will play in my -DVD player. Any suggestions on tutorials and programs to use will be appreciated
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#2
For a DVD that was recorded on a standalone recorder, I would use DVD Shrink to open and edit.
Backup to a new folder, play it back on the PC then burn the VIDEO_TS folder using ImgBurn.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42d7j-4v1lA
#3
Originally posted by attar:
For a DVD that was recorded on a standalone recorder, I would use DVD Shrink to open and edit.
Backup to a new folder, play it back on the PC then burn the VIDEO_TS folder using ImgBurn.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42d7j-4v1lA
Thank you
#4
I have another problem. I recorded a movie on a DVD-RW. It plays on my DVD player but the computer says the disc is blank - no files. To try to overcome this I put the disc back in the DVD player and tried to finalize it. Got error message that finalizing failed. Is there a way to read the disc on the computer or to finalize it on the computer?
#5
Try this:

http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/3040...l=1#post1864310

Or:
This is my process without the steps shown above to extract a .tao file - I opted to default to an .iso
I have recovered files from disks that were recorded on a standalone DVD recorder and were not finalized in the machine.

Download the free version of ISOBuster.

Insert the disk in the drive and run ISOBuster.
Choose the track that might be video and right click.
Elect to extract it and opt for user data.
The result is an iso file.

Note in my pic, there were two short recordings made.
Both are MB, while the other files are KB (track three and six are the actual video files).

The resultant .iso file can be opened in VirtualDub (if you want to output AVI files) or AviDemux if you want to save them as .mpg.



This message has been edited since its posting. Latest edit was made on 17 Feb 2013 @ 15:07
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