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120 min? I dun think so

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by alexmon27, Sep 12, 2004.

  1. alexmon27

    alexmon27 Member

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    Hey, I've been trying to burn a movie to a DVD. It says that I can make DVD's with up to 120 minutes on it (4.7g worth of video time) But when I put it on the DVD, it says that it does not have enough space on the DVD to burn it. The movie is less than 120 minutes, and the DVD is a standerd 4.7g 120 min disc. I'm using sonic DVD now software or My DVD to create the DVD with and a DVD+RW/+R 8X DVD external burner. How do I get the DVD to fit on the disc?
    thanks!
    ~alexmon
     
  2. flip218

    flip218 Moderator Staff Member

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    Is it a commercial dvd?
     
  3. alexmon27

    alexmon27 Member

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    commercial? It's a standerd buy it off bestbuy Verbatim DVD+R (4.7g) So yeah... why won't it burn it all? Is it the software I'm using?
     
  4. flip218

    flip218 Moderator Staff Member

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    Ummm ... No not the blank media. Your source ... Is it a commercial (ie. DVD Movie?) or is it a personal stuff that you want on a dvd?
     
  5. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    The first thing you need to do is forget the 120 minutes claim. DVD allows you to encode at many different bitrates and resolutions so the number of minutes varies greatly by how the video is encoded. If you don't have a good source and a good encoder you'll never get 2 hours of video on a blank with any kind of decent quality. Since I don't know what your source is I can't comment on that, but I can say that MyDVD doesn't qualify as a good encoder.

    Beyond that there isn't much I can say without more information about the source.
     
  6. alexmon27

    alexmon27 Member

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    Alright, well I know all about that kind of stuff. So basically what you're saying is that it is the software that I'm using... right? What program should I get then? And the source doesn't matter. I'm very videomedia, computer graphic related, give me the resolution and the bitrate, and I'll do it. Give me the file type and I'll do it. It's orignally divx (the first one I tried), and I converted the divx to a ".dv", ".avi", ".mpg", and even ".mov"... so what should I fix? But orginally it was divx, which was probably avi to begin with. The other one I tried to burn, they were all "mov's", but it says they're too long too, I don't mind lowering the quality, just tell me how I can get it on there or tell me what program(s) I need to get, thanks
     
  7. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    For an encoder you should use CCE, Canopus Procoder, MainConcept, or TMPGEnc. Of those, I'd recommend CCE because CCE SP is generally considered the highest quality encoder available (some people say Procoder is better) and CCE Basic uses the same encoding engine for a fraction of the price. Assuming you're not interested in spending $2000 on CCE SP, you can get CCE Basic for $58. The downside to CCE is that you pretty much need to use AviSynth to frameserve to it, but that's a lot easier than most people think. MainConcept is about $150, Procoder is around $500, and I think TMPGEnc will run you about $40.

    There are several DVD compliant resolutions you could use. For most projects, 720x480 (NTSC) or 720x576 (PAL) is the way to go. If that gives you encoding artifacts at whatever bitrate you end up using, you could encode to 352x480 (NTSC) or 352x576 (PAL). That resolution usually looks very good on a regular TV (Standard Definition/4:3), but I'm sure it wouldn't look nearly as good on an HDTV. You'll also need a bitrate calculator. I use a program called PowerBit (http://www.gallen.de/dvd/powerbit_en.html) but if you search Google you'll find others.

    You can also save more space for the video by making sure you use some sort of compressed audio. You can use MPA audio for decent compression, or AC3 for better compression. MPA audio isn't actually standards compliant to be the only audio stream on an NTSC disc, but most players will play it anyway. For PAL it's completely compliant. You should be able to get MPA output from whatever MPEG encoder you use. Compressing to AC3 is a little more complex, and you'll need another program to do it. You can get TMPGEnc's AC3 plugin for about $30 or use a free encoder (not completely reliable) that I can't remember the name of right now.

    Finally, you need an authoring program. The 2 I'd recommend looking at are TMPGEnc DVD Author for simple DVDs or DVD-Lab for more complex discs. You can get a 30 day trial of either one.

    Let us know if you need more information on any of this.
     
  8. alexmon27

    alexmon27 Member

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    Hey thanks man :) That actually really helps. Only question I've got is... you can choose the encoder you want to use, I know, and I know that you have to pay for CCE, so after I have CCE, doesn't adobe premiere/ adobe encore DVD have the ability to use that? I kinda figured it was that crappy My DVD software, lol... eww... free software, hehe. But I know of a lot of good burning programs, just wondering if adobe would be my best choice :) And hey, just fyi, I'm only new to DVD stuff, I've gotten a couple awards for modeling in 3ds Max and video media using adobe programs 'n stuff. Other than that I also am a nerdish freak and fix computers (within the parameters of the operating system 'n programs... not the stuff inside the computer, like the parts) and kill tons of viruses, if you ever have a problem with a virus or something, just send me an E-mail or something, I'd be glad to help! :)
     
  9. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    I wouldn't use Premiere, but that's a personal preference and I wouldn't take it as any more than that. I got a version of it with a PC, but I didn't like using it. To me AviSynth (a script based editor) makes more sense. Most people don't find that to be the case. If you're going to use an NLE with CCE, Premiere would seem to be the best choice because you can install CCE as a plugin for it.
     
  10. alexmon27

    alexmon27 Member

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    alright :) thanks bro. I'd probably use Adobe Encore over Premiere anyway because it's whole purpose is for DVD's, but I still have to figure out the whole program. THANKS! If I ever have anymore questions, I'll just give ya a buzz on here :) thanks again
     

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