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anybody have experience with Sonic media?

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by jester48, Oct 24, 2004.

  1. jester48

    jester48 Member

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    http://www.shop4tech.com/item2206.html

    A friend of mine says they work great, but the price seems too good to be true. Does anyone know the manufacturer of the discs and whether or not they are reliable?
     
  2. Mort81

    Mort81 Senior member

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  3. jester48

    jester48 Member

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    I'm not really looking to buy media right now... I just wanted to know the quality.
     
  4. S2K

    S2K Regular member

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    they are generally very poor quality.

    Does anyone know the manufacturer of the discs and whether or not they are reliable?

    no on one knows the manufacturer as sonic is not a manufacturer. It is a brand used by a couple of vendors to sell inferior run disks from any number of manufacturers.

    they have abysmal kprobe results, and as dye is usually extremely cheap, even if you get a successful burn, I wouldn't count on your data being good after a year
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2004
  5. jester48

    jester48 Member

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    Quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Gradual data loss. Also known as “disc fade” and “laser rot”, this is actually not very possible due to the mechanics of DVD recordable media. Terms like “disc fade” and “laser rot” only apply to pressed media, which are altogether different from recordable media in structure and physical/chemical properties. These theories are still widely argued, and applied only to the corrosion of the metal discs. The only feasible explanation for burned media “rotting” would be a breaking of the vacuum enclosure of the disc, allowing air and moisture to permeate the metal and dye. But such chain reaction would occur fairly quickly, not at a gradual pace of months. Simple explanation: The likely reason people face “disc rot” is that they simply did not check the media when it was first burned, Or the player/reader is now dirty, and not related to the disc at all.
    Source digitalfaq.com
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  6. S2K

    S2K Regular member

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    As much as the author lord smurf knows, he is no chemist and on his dye statment he has been effectively challenged this statement by people who are chemists.

    Dye does degrade. This has already been documentsw with many burned (not pressed) cds failing with a direct relationship to age.

    Moreover cheap disks often have problems with layer adhesion, you can feel rough edges and even extra glue from bad gluing. if this occurs the dye will get exposed, degrade even faster and you will end up with problems over time.

    Normal sunlight also will kill a dvdr. like most tests these are accelerative, but while the article shows total disk failure on 20 days of simulated sunlight, error rates are noticble at 2 days.

    http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?s=&threadid=51831

    /"The organic dye used in the data layer of R discs degrades naturally but slowly over time."
    http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub121/sec4.html

    "Originally, CD-R media were believed to last for many years because they are optical rather than magnetic. Unfortunately, the computer industry had discovered that many media brands would begin to degrade over time even under optimal storage conditions. Evidently this is because the dye layer on which the data is recorded by the CD recording laser would begin to deteriorate with age. Such discs may begin to show problems after a year."
    http://www.ht-audio.com/b-topic3.htm

    http://www.medialinenews.com/issues/2001/news/0314/0314.1.shtml
     

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