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benefits of deep analysis in Shrink?

Discussion in 'DVD Shrink forum' started by karen2003, Jun 15, 2004.

  1. karen2003

    karen2003 Regular member

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    Hi. I normally just use the quick analysis in Shrink (which takes just a minute or two), then go right into encoding, skipping the "deep analysis" step. My back-ups have been great, but I'm wondering what "deep analysis" will do? It takes a long time to add that step so I'm trying to do a cost-vs.-benefits analysis. Thanks.
     
  2. Nephilim

    Nephilim Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi,

    The Deep Analysis helps improve the picture quality when the movie is going to be compressed quite a bit.

    Of course, since picture quality is subjective depending on the individual and the equipment used to watch it's boils down to whether the extra time is worth any difference you may notice on your setup :)
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    JMLS-166S/Plextor PX-708A/Plextor Premium[/small]
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2004
  3. karen2003

    karen2003 Regular member

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    Ahhhh, thanks. I think I'll try it on a couple of discs and see if I notice a difference. I've had to compress things down as low as 50% on some DVDs and the back-ups have still been OK -- not quite as good as the original, but geez, it's just TV. :)

    Thanks again!
     
  4. Jetster

    Jetster Regular member

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    It also insures that the file will turn out at the size
    you set. If you don't use it your file can end up larger that you want. This is not usally a problem but in my case with DVD shrink I set a file at 4096 due to my FAT32 not handling larger files and without it
    the file came out at 4175 and I got an error due to this

     
  5. karen2003

    karen2003 Regular member

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    Hi Jetster, thanks for the reply. I actually do all my video work on a new hard drive that's NTSF so luckily I don't have a problem with file size.

    I did 2 back-ups of "The Sopranos" tonight, one with the deep analysis, one with the regular ... haven't burned 'em yet so I don't know if I'll be able to see the difference.

    Thanks again!
     
  6. Doc409

    Doc409 Active member

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    I am also starting to try the deep analysis feature. Does anyone have any results to talk about yet?
     
  7. karen2003

    karen2003 Regular member

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    I was skeptical, especially because doing "deep analysis" adds 45-60 minutes to the process, but I am sold now -- so much so that my new "policy" is that any DVD that has to be compressed to 80% or less, I'm going to do the deep analysis. Specifically, I backed up two Sopranos discs, the first without deep analysis, the second with it. Both had compression of 50-55% or so (can't remember exactly, but it was a LOT of compression). In both cases I ripped/encoded with Shrink and burned with RecordNow, which came with my Sony burner. The first disc WITHOUT deep analysis was certainly watchable, but there was some noticeable pixelation on my 32" TV (probably not noticeable on smaller TVs but a lot MORE noticeable on bigger ones) -- I could see it especially in the characters' faces. The second disc WITH deep analysis was so good that I could not see any difference from the original -- yes, even with compression of 50-55%!! So I would suggest that when compression goes below a certain percentage, then use the deep analysis. (Of course it's not necessary on discs that require no compression -- in fact, Shrink doesn't even give the "deep analysis" as an option with those discs.)

    I also was reading another thread about someone putting 2 or 3 full-length movies on 1 DVD by using Shrink, then Shrink again -- the compression would ultimately be way below 50% (probably more like 30-40%) on each disc, but they said the quality was still great even on large-screen TVs. (Maybe this was ScubaPete?) Anyway I'm completely sold. Try it on a disc that would require a lot of compression and see if you can notice a difference.
     
  8. Nephilim

    Nephilim Moderator Staff Member

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    My personal policy as well :)
     
  9. brobear

    brobear Guest

    I'll go with Nephilim, deep analysis is good when needed and the level depends on the hardware being used.

    Putting 3 full length movies on a single dvd5 is really pushing it though. A 4.7 disc only holds about 4.38GB in reality. Most full length movies are from about 3 to 4 GB and the newer movies are even higher. So 3 movies would have the compression in the 30% range, which is really pushing it. Even at 50% one can get some 'skippers'. DVDShrink is a good program, but if a person is going to push it to super high compression levels, they might want to go to different software that is more advanced.

    I started using Shrink when some of my other software was acting up. I've kept a copy and stay up on the updates. It's a good program within reason. With my setup I notice no difference in compression levels to about 75%. Anything higher than 70% in compression and I'm usually using another program. I did do a comparison with Shrink at about 50% using deep analysis and another program more specialized for larger movies. Of course the specialized program did better for its intended purpose. At the lower compression levels, there was no appreciable difference. What I learned was to use software within their limits. Shrink is good, but one shouldn't complain if they push it too far. For a lot of movies it does a great job and the price is definitely right (free). I have a 60" set due to my tired old peepers (at least that's what I told the missus) and those pixel problems jump at you from that size.
     
  10. nanostyle

    nanostyle Guest

    Brobear: What are those programs you prefer to use for large compression?
     
  11. brobear

    brobear Guest

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