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Borderline Question

Discussion in 'Convert DVD to another format' started by colw, Apr 21, 2005.

  1. colw

    colw Active member

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    Have been asked recently to look at a couple of relatively new, unreleased DVD's of Asian origin (probably Malaysian or Thai). These are movies such as Million Dollar Babe etc.

    They play fine in a standalone but are not recognised by a DVD ROM or DVD Burner. Additionally they are not recognised by Windows (2000 or XP) - have tried on at least half dozen different computers.

    The DVDs appear to be burnt (not pressed) and are professionally packaged and labelled as DVD9. They are not recognised by a Dual Layer burner either (which I initally thought may have been the problem).

    Any insights or suggestions as to why these DVDs are not recognised by the ROM, Burner or Windows would be appreciated. They do play in a standalone without any problems.

    Tks

    Col
     
  2. Nephilim

    Nephilim Moderator Staff Member

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    I can't actually tell you in technical terms why they act they way they do but I can tell you that I've seen plenty of folks with the exact same symptoms on discs from Southeast Asia. Wouldn't it be ironic if the bootleggers have their own form of copy protection!
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2005
  3. Phantom69

    Phantom69 Regular member

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    (only a suggestion) possibly try using AnyDVD or try inserting into a DVD burner, maybe your dvd player is multi region, however your drive is region locked.
    Or...
    try using a program called 'ISO Buster' to extract it as a TAO and then load into an image drive etc.. and re'author
     
  4. p4_tt

    p4_tt Active member

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    Over the last two years i've had two dvd burners 1st was a LG 2nd is a Philips, and after my 1st one kicked the bucket i got a new one and sometimes when i tried to play a dvd or even rip a dvd that i had burned with my old burner my new one would have problems reading the disc or sometimes not even show up in My Computer but would play fine in my dvd player, i dont know why but i can tell you it was not the quaity of the media i was using that was the problem.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2005
  5. colw

    colw Active member

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    Hi guys/gals

    Thanks for the input.

    Neph - it would be very ironic if the bootleggers have their own form of copy protection!

    The problem I have is that basically the DVD is not recognised by Windows (2000 or XP). I have tried in five different computers with five different DVD ROMS and five different DVD burners.

    As stated previously, it plays fine in a standalone player.

    After some thinking (painful) and research, I was wondering if it is possible that I am looking at an EVD disk and do not have the appropriate codec's (see article below).

    Again, any insights, suggestions would be welcome.
    __________________________________________________________________
    Back in 1999, China began working on an alternative to DVD known as Enhanced Versatile Disc (EVD) in order to free Chinese player manufacturers of the royalty charges required to support DVD. In the past year the EVD format has moved on enough to the point where EVD players are becoming widely available in China. Now the EVD format has been formally declared as the national standard for digital video discs, according to China's Ministry of Information Industry (MII).

    EVD's physical specifications are like that of a DVD with a 12cm disc diameter, same UDF file system and disc capacity of around 8.5GB. In fact an EVD can even be read in a PC’s DVD-ROM drive. However to cut back on royalty charges, EVD uses On2 Technologies' VP5 and VP6 codecs for its Video and EAC (Enhanced Audio Codec) 2.0 for its audio.

    By using these alternative codec’s, the overall royalty charges per EVD player are less than one-fifth of that than for each DVD player. Besides different codec’s, the EVD format supports HDTV due to ON2's much more efficient video compression compared with MPEG2 as used on DVD. The EAC audio format supports 1, 2 and 6 (5.1) channel configurations. Finally, by using their own format, they are no longer dependant on foreign
    ______________________________________________________________________
     
  6. Nephilim

    Nephilim Moderator Staff Member

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    Very interesting colw. Have you tried googling for the codecs?
     
  7. colw

    colw Active member

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    Thanks Neph - have not looked yet but its on the agenda.

    Do not currently have the DVD as it belongs to someone else - it's the challenge rather than the movie I'm interested in.
     
  8. Nephilim

    Nephilim Moderator Staff Member

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    The thrill of the chase indeed! :)
     

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