1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Burned DVDs Stop Being Read Over Time?

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by Chuck4, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. Chuck4

    Chuck4 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    I've burned some movies using DVDShrink, then Nero and my PC's DVD writer. Sometimes I'll watch them right away and sometimes it's months before I get to them. I use all types of blanks, from name brands to store brands.

    I'm curious about this, which I've only noticed recently:

    I have a DVD that I've played successfully in the past, but not in, say, 6 months.
    I put it in my DVD Recorder/Player and it spits it out as unreadable or incompatible.
    I take that burned unplayable DVD and re-DVDShrink and burn it again.
    The new DVD plays fine.

    What would cause the original to not play? I keep them in slim jewel cases in an upright position, not stacked on top of each other. I haven't noticed that this affects any particular brand. Is my Recorder/Player just getting cranky?

    Thanks...
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2012
  2. attar

    attar Senior member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,509
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    128
    You should use blanks that are known to be consistently reliable.
    A consistently reliable disk is 'Verbatim' disks that say 'Advanced AZO' (referring to the dye) on the package.
    I've seen disks that were burned and immediately failed in a standalone player that were fine on the PC.
     
  3. Mez

    Mez Active member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    2,936
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    68
    I have a massive library spanning more than a decade. I have seen hundreds of failures.

    Attar is 100% correct. I have had the least failure rate with Verbatum. Probably the burn rate matters as well. STAY AWAY from Nero. Only burn Verbatum with imgburn at 2-3x. I use 2.5 X. Even they can die if let upside down where sunlight can ruin them. I find Sony and Fugi disks to become unreadable after 4-7 years even if stored perfectly. The pits must fade with time. The disks appear to be blanks from the computer. The burn looks brand new. I burn so that there is a tiny ring of unburned at the edge. That can help you see aging. With some to can see a difference others you can't. Funny, unbranded 2X burned at 1X have a far lower failure rate than the 8-16x 2nd tier media. These are all more than 8 yrs old and still mostly good. I am slowly going through my library and making copies of anything I would be sorry to lose on 2nd tier media. You can try using ripit4me to try to recover a disk. That is your last chance effort on a failed disk. I have about a 20% success rate. My problem is many disks are long dead before they are discovered. My player can read as well as my computer. Now I see that can be a problem because when they do not play they are usually unrecoverable.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2012
  4. Chuck4

    Chuck4 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Thanks for the replies.

    I've started accelerating the archiving of stuff I recorded on VHS in the 80's. It'd be pretty ridiculous to have the tapes hold up for 30 years, ditch them, and then have the discs go bad after 6 months!
     
  5. Mez

    Mez Active member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Messages:
    2,936
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    68
    Exactly! I read something where CDs are supposed to have very long lives. That was when a CD cost a buck a piece.

    For some reason the slower they are burned the longer they last. I really do not know how common this problem is. I have been burning since before Shrink and 70% or more of what I have is more than 5 years old. I have very few failure that were 2X DVDs burned at 1X. Those are the oldest, back where 2x was as fast as they made them.
     

Share This Page