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Converting AVI to DVD - Question from Guide

Discussion in 'MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 encoding (AVI to DVD)' started by willise, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. willise

    willise Member

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    I haver tried converting AVI to DVD usinf many methods (WinAvi, Nero, etc) none seen to work as well as I want, so I am trying the guide supplied on this site (Convert a DivX or XviD AVI to DVD http://www.afterdawn.com/guides/archive/convert_avi_to_dvd.cfm). After hours of reading, I began the process of converting a 16x9 AC3 AVI file. Following the guide, I have a couple of questions.

    1. Using AVICodec, the video is shown to be 16x9 format, so do I select this format in TMPGenc or leave it as the default? At the end of the guide it says 16x9 format requires a moive advanced approach. In the guide, the author uses a 4x3 format for the example.

    2. In TMPGenc, when inserting the audio file (M2V), the next box is for the Audio file that was extracted, I assume. However the guide does not say to fill in this box with the loacation of the AC3 file that was extracted. Is this just an omission? Do I have to fill in this box?

    3. Finally, the resulting files from TMPGenc are M2V and MP2, I believe. Will this still give me 5.1 sound the way the AVI did with AC3?

    Thanks a lot
     
  2. nownthen

    nownthen Regular member

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    The conversion will still work which ever output size you decide to go with. Changing it may decrease the end video quality.

    When you select your video file the sound with that will show up in the audio selection. Your going to have select the wav files (whatever type you made the audio).

    Does you burning program ask for sound and video seperately. I've never made any dvd's but I have made many Vcd's and the sound and the video have to be combined.
     

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