1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

converting divx to dvd -r

Discussion in 'DivX / XviD' started by fugsi, Apr 4, 2004.

  1. fugsi

    fugsi Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    i just downloaded movie which is 3hrs long
    in divx format 720 x 304 2 video of 1 1/2 hrs long file size first video is 982,616 second one is 978,717

    23 fps video, audio using 160 kbps audio format lame mp3 48,00 khz

    my problems is burning into dvd format i've done conversion from 720x 576 normal pal version layer 2
    each video is coming to be over 3.2gb and 3.7 gb

    how do bring the file size down to fit into 1 dvd 4.7gb ?

    just tried after reading that from tmpgenc to bring the resolution down to 352 x 288 and audio leave at 48,000 khz 25fps (pal) tmpgenc dvd author will recognise as dvd format ! but the same problem the file size has not made a big difference i have also changed from constant bitrate to variable bitrate 450,00

    will make a difference if i turn in to ntsc mode ?

    can you please help me

     
  2. Kev0192

    Kev0192 Guest

    Try to merge the two files together using TMPGEnc so you have one video file.

    Then use TMPGEnc DVD Author to create DVD compliant VOB files from your video. Save it as a image file and then use a transcoder like DVD Shrink to get the size of the resulting image file to fit on a DVD-R and then it should be ready to burn.

    Also, depending on what region your DVD Player is, you may need to convert it to NTSC which would be 29 FPS instead of the 23 FPS you have now. Again, you can use TMPGEnc DVD source creator to change it.

    All of the TMPGEnc software is available for free trial at their website.
     
  3. whassup

    whassup Regular member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2003
    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    First of all, I'd edit out where you got the movie from.

    Secondly, it's the bitrate and not resolution that determines file size. Rather than encode and then transcode, just use a bitrate calculator (such as DVTool) to determine the optimal bitrate for encoding so it'll fit perfectly onto a single DVD-R.
     

Share This Page