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Copying a copy from a copy

Discussion in 'DVD2One forum' started by reload, Apr 20, 2003.

  1. reload

    reload Guest

    As far as I know, in order to make a copy of a copy, just rip the disc again using DVD Decrypter and then burn that VIDEO_TS folder back on to another DVD-R. Because your first copy should have already been compressed to the right size (4.36 GB) to burn onto a DVD-R you shouldn't have to use DVDXCopy or DVD2One or any similar program.
     
  2. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    It is fairly easy (especially when you've done a couple of times at least)

    [bold]Copy a Copy:[/bold] [if you have 2 DVD Drives]
    Nero Burning Rom 5.5.9.9. (or above)
    DVD>Copy a DVD>Select DVD-Rom&tick box Fast Copy[on-the-fly]

    DVD2One or DeCrypter will not be needed as you will have already unencrypted the movie the first time round as reload was saying.

    herbs

     
  3. reload

    reload Guest

    Most people don't have 2 DVD drives (a separate reader and writer), so by using the tools you already have you can use DVD Decrypter to rip, or copy, the files onto your hard drive. That's what Decrypter does... it disables the CSS, or copy protection, on exhisting DVDs and copies all of the files onto your computer. If your source is a copy then obviously you have already done this once so you main objective is just to copy the files that exhist on the DVD onto your hard drive. Once the files are copied to your computer then just burn them to another DVD-R or DVD+R using Nero, RecordNowMax, or something similar. It's the initial copy that's the most difficult, which can be done using this process Decrypter->DVD2One->Nero. I hope this has helped.
     
  4. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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  5. reload

    reload Guest

  6. spotme

    spotme Guest

    never ever copy anything on the fly
     
  7. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    it's okay to copy on-the-fly , but it is better that you have DVD Drives on different IDE Cables
     
  8. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Hold on TOC, when making a copy of a copy you shouldnt have to re-rip it. That doesnt make sense. When you rip a DVD and create a DVD-R, copying the DVD-R onto another DVD-R is sufficient, there is no need to rip the original again. Digital Media dosnt have the same effects as VHS copies.
    Apart from that, the rest seemed fine to me! ;-)
    Copy on the fly at lower speeds than DVD to HDD to DVD-R
     
  9. Yuriv

    Yuriv Regular member

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    Ifyou don't have 2 DVD drives, all you need is DVDdecrypter to make a copy of your copy. Go to this link, it's a very straightforward guide:
    http://www.dvdrhelp.com/forum/userguides/141024.php#dvd5
    While the guide does talk about decrypting the DVD, you don't have to worry about this (as it has been pointed out already that the disc is already decrypted) - you are basically just using DVDDecrypter as a copy program.
    Following this guide, you will make an ISO copy of your source DVD on your harddrive, then you will use DVDDecrypter to burn it back onto a fresh DVD-r.
    Simple as 1-2-3...
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2003
  10. imcville

    imcville Member

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    I've found that on-the-fly copies are less reliable than re-ripping the backup and burning from HDD. Definitely worth taking the extra few minutes if you ask me.
     
  11. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree , defintely worth taking your time [ for reliability factor alone ].
     
  12. JW_LEES

    JW_LEES Guest

    Hi guys, I had major probs. when I first installed my AO5. I set it up as secondary master & my DVD reader as secondary slave, my cd writer was already occupying the primary slave position. My daughters wedding was on DVD & I did a copy using NERO, it TOOK 11 HOURS !! After a lot of soul searching and trying differant burning software. I decided to change the position of the drives, I changed the AO5 to primary slave the DVD reader to secondary master & my CD writer to secondary slave & EUREKA it took about 10 mins. to burn.
     
  13. carlitob

    carlitob Regular member

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    TOC,

    When you make a copy of a DVD you are usually compressing a double layered DVD which is anywhere from 5-8GB to 4.36GB that fits on a single layered DVD-R, this is the only type of blank DVD-R available. You can take your newly made copy and not have to re-compress it to make another copy. Just a direct copy since there will be no copyright protection. You can even just yank the files off in Windows and then use NERO or RecordnowMax to create a new copy.

    Also on the note of how long they will last. I would venture to say at least 20 years with very good care. You have to remember its not like VHS this is digital all 1's and 0's. This type of data does not detriorate with time. The only thing you gotta worry about is the media, and If you do want your DVD's to outlast you that will greatly depend on your type of media. More expensive-better quality-longer lasting_X_X_X_X_X_[small]Don't ask a question that has been asked a million times already don't be lazy all the info you need is here: http://www.afterdawn.com/articles/

    Pioneer A05
    Xbox
    PS2- Magic 3.1
    Over 50 Movies so far to know what I got PM me.
    [/small]
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2003
  14. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    There has been a recent study that shows that DVD's do degrade at a faster rate than was perhaps 1st thought.

    They call it 'DVD Rot' ... so making more than 1 back up is not a bad idea.
     
  15. Claudia5

    Claudia5 Guest

    Hello to everyone and I would like to especially thank everyone who has helped with the "idiot's guide" to dvd-copy-to-copy, which I am going to attempt tonight using all of your guidance and suggestions. I appreciate your making things easy to understand as I am similar to TOC in being new to this.

    I would like to add to the discussion about DVD longevity. I am a librarian by profession and when our library first started moving data to CD's and DVD's, we looked into the degradation issue extensively. The British Library has done extensive tests on the highest grade CD's and theorize that they will last about 20 years, given optimum storage conditions. However, as several forum users have pointed out, moisture and humidity do affect the surface.

    Since DVD's use an organic material, it is susceptible to material degradation from environmental conditions. Since DVD's and CD's are new, tests can only extrapolate from degradation from severe environmental tests, as to when the cd or dvd will become so degraded that it will not be usable.

    Personally, I keep my media in those plastic clamshells which snap shut and hope that they are protected from humidity in those. Jewel cases should serve the same function. Ideally of course we could all keep them in climate-controlled storage...alas, my house didn't come equipped with one of those rooms!

    Thanks again for all the helpful suggestions.

    Claudia
     
  16. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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  17. Claudia5

    Claudia5 Guest

    Thanks for the interesting links, Herbsman. Also that is certainly an eye-catching graphic!

    If the studios saved the money they are using to develop such things as the 48-hour dvd and used it to just lower the price of the media to where ordinary people could easily afford it, they wouldn't have to fight a piracy problem. imho.

    Media corporate heads who think that the average person on a working salary won't blink at $16-$30 cd's and dvd's have obviously been making megabucks for so long they have no idea what people on ordinary salaries are contending with.

    That is what I think is so cool about technology and all the really smart people who gather together on forums such as this. I will bet the collective intellect of afterdawn against a studio anytime.

    All the best,
    Claudia
     
  18. DJRikki

    DJRikki Member

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    In reply to DVD rot, I thought this was a problem with the glue used to attach the layers of the DVD's together?

    Something DVD-R's do not have.
     
  19. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    I have some Datawrite Classic X2 DVD-R media & they have a double protection system
    So some DVD-R are succeptable to DVD rot
     
  20. DJRikki

    DJRikki Member

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    I would assume double protection is different from double data layer.
     

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