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Creating your own dvd-audio cd?

Discussion in 'High resolution audio' started by akala, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. akala

    akala Guest

    Is it posible to creat your own dvd-a cd?
    Like download files (songs) that are recorded in 5:1 and burn them with your dvdrecorder? So that you can play it on suraound system...and it will sound like a bought dvd-a cd?
    Is WaveLab 5.0 anything like that?

    Thank you experts!
     
  2. haysonics

    haysonics Member

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    DVD-A is 24bit which is higher quality than 16Bit CD. So it is more than just having 5.1 channels instead of 2 that makes a DVD-A what it is. I don't think you'll find much on the net cause 5.1 channels of 24BIT music takes up a hell of a lot of space. It would take a long time to download a song, let alone a whole album. The majority of what's on the net is MP3 which is much lower quality than CD and so takes up very little space. In 10 years there will probably be a lot on the net but at the moment the majority of people are happy with low quality MP3.

    Also keep in mind that a DVD-A disc is different from a normal DVD. They may both have 5.1 channels but the info is stored differently. You can't use a regular dvd ripper program (like for example dvd shrink) to rip the content off a DVD-A disc. There are a couple of software programs out there that can author DVD-A content. If you can find a program to rip DVD-A you would still be left with the problem of obtaining the DVD-A discs to rip from. If you had a friend with a collection you could borrow his I suppose.

    My advice, if you have the cash, buy a cheap universal player that plays DVD-A's and SACD's and buy some DVD-A's and SACD's. You won't be able to trade songs but you can impress your friends when they come over with comments like "This is how the music sounds in the recording studio". Enjoy.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2005
  3. kanyons

    kanyons Member

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    You should be able to burn a dvd data disc in Nero. Using mp3 or wav files, these files are the probably the best you'll get.
     
  4. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

  5. akala

    akala Guest

    There are a couple of software programs out there that can rip DVD-A content but then you are left with the problem of obtaining the DVD-A discs to rip from...
    What is the name of those programs?


    My advice, if you have the cash, buy a cheap universal player....
    Yes i have a panasonic soround system but it doesnt play sacd...welll doesnt mater anyway...is there a difference betwen dvd-a and sacd?
     
  6. akala

    akala Guest

    [bold]Diabolos wrote:[/bold] (The answer is) No! You can't rip a DVD-Audio disc. You also can't create an audio CD anywhere neer the quality of DVD-Audio. Some type of compression would have to be used.

    [bold]haysonics wrote:[/bold]
    There are a couple of software programs out there that can rip DVD-A content

    Are there programs or not? And if so what is the name?
    Thank you!
     
  7. haysonics

    haysonics Member

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    Sorry, My mistake,
    I should have said there are a couple of programs that allow you to author (not rip) DVD-A. Wilkes mentions one such authoring program in the thread/poll at the top titled "should the law allow......" Sorry I can't remember the name, but I am sure you'll find it worth reading through.

    DVD-A and SACD are different formats. It doesnt matter that your panasonic doesnt play SACD's unless of course there are SACD's that you want to play. Due to the technicalities involved I won't go into detailing the differences here or the hot debate of which sounds better. Both sound great to my ears.

    I haven't come across any downloadable 5.1 mixes on the net (not that I have been looking). Do you find much available on the net akala?
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2005
  8. akala

    akala Guest

    ...Well no i havent found any...I guess it's yet not time for them. Mabye when or if dvd-a gets more popular...
    Anyway i bought a dvd-a disc "Vivaldi four seasons" and it sounds great! really big difference listening to dvd-a and regular cd.
    I saw also that the store was selling led zeppelin in dvd-a. How can this be when hes cd was recorded in the 70's????

    Information
    This 2-disc DVD-Audio album contains the original 18 live-tracks. Containing two and a half hours of live rock, 'How The West Was Won' contains performances recorded during two concerts at the Los Angeles Forum and Long Beach Arena on June 25th and June 27th 1972. These recordings were produced by Jimmy Page. Exclusive colour photos of the group performing live on stage introduce each track. There are also options to choose between 5.1 Surround Sound and Stereo playback.

    How is this possible???
     
  9. haysonics

    haysonics Member

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    The standard way to record music, either in a studio or live (until recently) was to record it onto a multitrack tape machine. Youve probably seen these in pictures. They have big reels of tape, typically 2 inch wide, running at either 15 or 30 inches per second.

    Remember cassettes? Well cassette tape has 4 tracks on it, 2 tracks for side A (left & right channels/speakers) and 2 tracks for side B (left & right channels/speakers). The first 4 Beatles albums were recorded on big tape reels that had 4 tracks (like big cassettes really). By 1966, Tape had 8 tracks on it. Then came 16. Then 24.

    Basically you can record a bass guitar on track 1, electric on track 2, another electric on 3, keyboard on 4, vocals on .....well you get the picture.

    When you have laid down all your tracks you then mix the recording down to 2 tracks. Thats your stereo mix. Nowdays bands are getting their multitracks tapes out of storage and doing new mixdowns. Now they are mixing the recording onto a computer storage device at 24BIT resolution and issuing high quality "remasters". They can of course now also mix their recording to 5.1 channels as well (also at 24BIT).

    So now you can buy a DVD-A which contains new mixes, in stereo (2 channels) and surround (5.1 channels) at 24 Bit.

    PS. I should add that some bands are very happy with their original stereo mixes (on analogue tape) and so transfer these to the 24Bit workstation for remastering rather than do a new mix.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2006
  10. Augmented

    Augmented Member

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    Certainly the recording studios have Software that allows one to create a 5.1 DVD-A. Maybe that is the software you should purchase?
     
  11. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    Absolutly right haysonics! I think its sad that most people don't know what there missing. Even if the music is from the 60's it is possible to remaster it to 6 channel audio. With todays tech each track would have its own discrete sound info and channel, not to mention the 24-bit sound stream sampled at 96 KHz.

    Magnetic Tape info:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_recording#Multitrack_recording

    Ced
     
  12. bitbrain2

    bitbrain2 Member

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    I know 2 programs that can author DVD-A´s, one is very expensive, Minnetonka Discwelder, and the second is Steinberg Wavelab 5.0

    bitbrain2
     
  13. madtamski

    madtamski Member

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    I've recently came across this piece of software
    named "Audio DVD Creator". It converts standard
    CD audio, or mp3's to AC3. It also creates simple playlist menus.

    Here's the homepage...

    http://www.audio-dvd-creator.com/index.htm

    p.s. 1st post :D
     
  14. zjzzjc1

    zjzzjc1 Member

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    Is there any such software
     
  15. madtamski

    madtamski Member

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    Well yes, I just posted a link to one two posts above this one!

    It's works fine.
     
  16. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    It's just that Audio DVD Creator has nothing whatsoever to do with DVD-Audio...

    There's NO program that can rip DVD-Audio. All "DVD Audio Ripper" programs rip the DD/DTS audio from DVD-Video disks...

    There ARE programs that can author DVD-Audio, like Discwelder, DVD-Audio Creator, Wavelab. But if you want high-quality 96/24/5.1 DVD-Audio you also need:

    * High-quality 96/24/5.1, which you can't get if you're not creating it yourself or take it from a hacked DVD player in PCM format.
    * A MLP encoder, since that HQ 96/24/5.1 audio can't play on a DVD-Audio player without compression. Surcode MLP, costs $2500. Both Discwelder and Wavelab needs this, if you want the real HQ audio. I think DVD-Audio Creator recommends Sonicstage HD as MLP encoder, probably $2500. meridian has an encoder as well, I think. $2500.

    Edit: One possibility is 44.1/16/5.1 DVD-Audio. That would be surround sound in CD quality, with lower data throughput than the limit for DVD players and better sound than DD/DTS 5.1. I haven't checked if that's part of the DVD-Audio standard, though. And DTS 5.1 could be done with lower compression than on normal DVD-Video disks, Jean-Michel Jarre's "Aero" shows how good the sound can be. And Surcode DTS only costs $99, but I don't know what limitations that may have.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2005
  17. XBG

    XBG Member

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    I have The Allman Brothers "Live at Filmore East" in DTS 5.1 and it sounds like it was recorded yesterday but it was actually taped in March of 1971.

    I also have Fleetwood Mac's studio album "Rumours" in DVD Audio and it's the same, being recorded in 1977.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2005
  18. cccgi

    cccgi Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm totally new to this forum. Just minutes ago I came across this thread and I'm interested in ripping DVD-A. Just recently I heard that it can be done by a patched version of WinDVD. The original article named "DVD-Audio's CPPM can be got around with a WinDVD patch" can be found on cdfreaks.com, try this link: http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/12061

    But as the article said that patch from Rarewares had gone not long ago. I've been trying to look everywhere if some websites mirror that patch, but still can't find one. If anybody can find, please post the link for everyone.

    I also found it is very interesting with Ulead DVD MovieFactory - Disc Creator version, which said in the website:

    "Make Dolby® Digital Audio DVD Discs
    You can pack 45 hours of Dolby® Digital Audio music onto one DVD disc. Import uncompressed CD music and it will automatically be converted. Play the completed discs on almost any car or home DVD player.

    Burn DVD-Audio Discs
    Get 6 hours of great, uncompressed-quality music on a DVD-Audio disc. Play on DVD-Audio players or on DVD players that support the DVD-Audio format."

    Follow this link:
    http://www.ulead.com/dmf/new.htm

    My question is that if anybody tries this software? I tried the Standard version, but I found it's so simple that it's not useful for me.
     
  19. jjolson

    jjolson Member

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    Well, how difficult do you want it for it to be useful to you?
     
  20. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    It's illegal to rip protected DVD-A discs, and I for one have no intentions of telling anyone how to do it.

    As far as the Ulead package goes, you gets what you pays for.
    If you need all the bells & whistles, then you need Sonic's DVD-Audio creator ($5,000 for the LE version & $15K for the full one) or Minnetonka's Chrome ($3000 plus MLP at another $2500, or both for $5,000)

    The Ulead tool is consumer grade.
    If you want Pro grade, then you have to pay for it.
     

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