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Cutting the director"s commentary out

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by aztec1, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. aztec1

    aztec1 Member

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    hi, i have a question on editing the dvd audio, i did a search but i really did not find anything related to my question.
    on some movies like resident evil2 it has a director's commentary that starts talking over the original audio, as soon as the movie begins, so i have to press audio on my remote to stop it, is there a way to cut/edit that out and what would be the tool to do it.

    even thought i pick only english ac3, sometimes is there.

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. sadsac

    sadsac Guest

    DVD shrink gives you all the audio on the disk. You just have to pick the audio that you want to remove. It's usually listed as "English 2 ch. commentary" or something like that. I just found this out a week or two ago.....when previewing in the bottom window with DVD shrink, if you right click on the preview screen, you can select the audio you want to preview. Then, you can edit out whatever you want and be sure you're not getting rid of something useful to you.
     
  3. baabaa

    baabaa Active member

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    Yep, I concur.

    Usually they contain at least one 5.1 stream and a 2ch stream and the 2ch stream normally contains the directors commentary.

    Therefore if you have at least 2 streams to choose from, ie 5.1 english and 2ch, then ditch the 2ch, as this will more than likely the directors commentary, I don't think they bother putting the commentary as 5.1, because there is no need for it.(no seperate frequecny ranges in commentary)

    Also, you have no need to worry about just retaining the 5.1ch stream as all systems, tv,s etc downmix the 6 channels of sound to produce 2ch stereo (if you havne't got an amplifier/decoder etc), so you will always have 2ch stereo which is a very clear sound from a dvd...............

     
  4. aztec1

    aztec1 Member

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    wow, are you guys a great help or what.!!
    thank you so much for the explanation, i really appreciated.
    Got it.
     
  5. baabaa

    baabaa Active member

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    Your welcome.................

    BTW: just be careful about the DTS audio options.
    DTS is a seperate streaming process and requires an amplifier/decoder that can decode DTS to produce the sound.
    DTS cannot be downmixed to 2ch stereo, so if you just keep the DTS and you haven't got an amplifier/decoder then you will not receive ANY sound and therefore it will just be silent.

    The rules I work to:(I have an amplifier/decoder)
    2ch only, one of them will be directors commentary - ditch that one
    5.1 and 2ch - ditch the 2ch
    DTS, 5.1 2ch - ditch the 2ch and retain the 5.1 and DTS

     
  6. sadsac

    sadsac Guest

    A word of caution on the DTS track:

    It takes up GOBS of space. Up to 3:1 to the 5.1 track. I noticed that most DTS tracks were about 800 to 900mb compared to 300 to 400mb for the 5.1 track. On one movie, I noticed that the 5.1 track was 350mb compared to a WHOPPING 1300mb for the dts track.

    I don't have personal experience with comparing the dts and 5.1 tracks, so this isn't the gospel by any means. But I read somewhere that only the audiophile can tell the difference in dts and normal 5.1.

    I'm sure this is probably the wrong information. I'll bet that since dts track is larger, there's bound to be a noticeable difference. In my opinion though, you'd only notice a difference in the "feel" of the audio. I'm pretty positive that there's deeper bass and higher treble notes in the DTS track. So you'd probably only notice a difference in a high dollar entertainment system (which I don't have).

    My point is, if you don't split your movie between 2 disks and opt to keep the DTS track on your disk, you'd lose some video quality to compression. You can split the movie between 2 disks and keep the dts track without compressing the video if you want it that way.

    On a personal note, I try not to keep the dts track A: Because I don't have a dts receiver. B: Because I don't like to compress my movies that much and I try to only split really long movies.

    So for me, the dts usually goes out the window.
     

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