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Do you need a specific brand HDMI cable for 4.95 Gbps?

Discussion in 'HD DVD discussion' started by mclure, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. mclure

    mclure Member

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    I've only seen Monster cables advertising this (the cable being able to transfer 4.95 Gbps). Don't all HDMI cables do this? If not, is this why the Monste cables are so expensive?

    Do I need Monster cables (or similar for 4.95 Gbps), or will a $30-$40 HDMI cable still do the same thing?

    Toshiba HD-DVD HD-A30
    Onkyo TX-SR705
    Sony SXRD KDS 50A2000

    Thanks,
    Bobby
     
  2. cheezzzz

    cheezzzz Regular member

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    Even an $11.00 HDMI cable will do.

    cheezzzz
     
  3. aabbccdd

    aabbccdd Guest

    Yes the less expensive cables will work fine . don't spend 80.00 plus dollars on the Monster cable!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 24, 2007
  4. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    This question is had to answer because price isn't equate to performance with HDMI cables as everyone is trying to make money of off this new got to have item.

    Monster has just released what they call speed rated cables. This is a step in the right direction (with a new speed rating test coming soon) but still doesn't tell you what the cables max abilities are. Monster just tells you that this cable is certified at whatever, not if won't work for purposes that it isn't certified for (they most likely will in all cases).

    So long post short buy a well built cable and you should be fine. If the cable is 40-60 dollars then it should be just as good as one twice the price.

    Ced
     
  5. ugc

    ugc Regular member

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    Realistically speaking, all cables are not the same.

    First, under HDMI 1.2 and below, there were no "layers" of compliance testing. Cables either tested compliant, or they didn't. Under HDMI 1.3, there are now two layers of compliance testing possible, one called "Category 1," equivalent to the prior spec, and the other called "Category 2," a higher-bandwidth spec. But this "Category 2" criterion doesn't correspond neatly to any commonly-recognized characteristic like a resolution (e.g. 1080p) or color depth (e.g. 16-bit); the fact that a cable passes Category 2 testing doesn't mean it will perform at any particular standard in actual use.

    Now, here's the kicker. Compliance testing is required only for a manufacturer's first product in a product category. So if one is a manufacturer of cable, all that has to be done is to meet compliance testing, once, for a single batch of cable. After that, no external compliance testing is required by the HDMI organization at all. One can build, for example, a 24 AWG cable with PE dielectric and bare copper conductors, have compliance testing done on it, and then go on to build a cable of a completely different design--say, a polyolefin dielectric, with 28 AWG tinned copper conductors--and do no compliance testing at all.

    And the kicker has a kicker. The product submitted for compliance can be of any length; so HDMI compliance testing protocols tell you that an HDMI adopter has, at some unknown time in the past, built a test sample of unknown characteristics and unknown length, which passed HDMI compliance testing. That test sample may bear no resemblance whatsoever to the cable you're buying. Reassuring, huh?

    The above is just a copy and paste of a tech page on HDMI.

     
  6. mclure

    mclure Member

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    The reason I asked this question was because my understanding is that HD-DVD/Blu-Ray transmits at 4.95 Gbps for full 1080p. Is this not correct? If so, wouldn't you want to have the proper bandwidth to support the 1080p signal? In other words, the proper HDMI rated cable for these high def formats.

    Thanks,
    Bobby
     
  7. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    You are correct (if you are using 1080p/30Hz with 7.1 Uncompressed audio to an audio receiver, ect...). The proper cable would be a Monster 700 or 800 series cable. My point is that the cable being certified doesn't have any baring (Yet) as to what the cable is truly capable off (its maximum performance). You are most likely to get the same quality out of a monster 400 series HDMI as their 1000 series.

    All that is needed is a decent cable from a reputable vendor. Under 25 ft most designs work well enough. If you need cables larger than that then you should be looking for a expensive cable as any cheap cable would most likely be a waste of time.

    Ced
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2007

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