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DSL Lite

Discussion in 'Windows - P2P software' started by DivXer, Feb 7, 2004.

  1. DivXer

    DivXer Member

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    I'm getting BellSouth DSL Lite and I wanted to know what is the average download speeds.

    I have 56k and my download speed is usually 5kb/s...
     
  2. Mattrage

    Mattrage Regular member

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    Do a google search or go to bellsouth.net . :p

    If you're still feeling lazy, if my memory serves me correctly, DSL lite is 768 kb/s down, which equates to a about 94 KB/s.
     
  3. DivXer

    DivXer Member

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    I have already looked on BellSouth's site, they say its 256kb/s but its never really as fast as they say it is... So how fast do you think it will be?
     
  4. Mattrage

    Mattrage Regular member

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    Well, 256 kilobits is about 31 kB/s, and I have no reason to believe that you won't get every bit of it. DSL is *typically* pretty consistent, and hitting that cap shouldn't be a problem.
     
  5. DivXer

    DivXer Member

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    O thanks, how do you get the 31kb/s when i gave you 256? I just thought it would be 1/10th of what they say it is....
     
  6. Mattrage

    Mattrage Regular member

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    Well, there's 8 bits per byte. However, you can't just divide by 8, as there are 1024 bytes per kilobyte, not 1000. Basically, you end up with 8.192 as the conversion factor.

    Explanation:

    Although computer data and file size is normally measured in binary code using the binary number system (counted by factors of two 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, etc), the prefixes for the multiples are based on the metric system! The nearest binary number to 1,000 is 2^10 or 1,024; thus 1,024 bytes was named a Kilobyte. So, although a metric "kilo" equals 1,000 (e.g. one kilogram = 1,000 grams), a binary "Kilo" equals 1,024 (e.g. one Kilobyte = 1,024 bytes). Not surprisingly, this has led to a great deal of confusion. Because of this confusion, many people continue to blindly assert that you need only to divide kb/s by 8 to get to kB/s.

    Here's the math:
    bits per kilobit = 1000 bits
    bits per kilobyte = 8*1024 = 8192 bits
    kilobits per kilobyte = 8192/1000 = 8.192
     

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