1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Dual DVD Capacity CALLING ALL PROGRAMMERS

Discussion in 'All other topics' started by unwanted, Jul 16, 2003.

  1. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

    Can sum1 plz invent dual capacity dvds i need them. And if it cannot be done y?

    I heard rumours that Sony/Phillips/One of those bigshot companies invented a dvd that holds 19x the original size.
     
  2. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Dont you mean engineers? hehe... btw what do you mean by dual capacity? 9GB? 17GB? cuz those have already been made... (i'm pretty sure they have at least)
     
  3. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

    yer programmers engineers all the same to me

    an if there invented y r ppl still rippin dvds reducin quality then burning them. It shud b as simple as to prees a button an get a exact duplicate. (for backup purposes only of course)
     
  4. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    You and I both know that the majority of those one-click-backups arent gonna be legit. Theres gonna be a crapload of 12 year old punks pirating software. Besides, such technology does exist. They are called bitburners.

    In that case, let me take it upon myself to explain it to you. Engineering is a regulated profession wheras programming (formally known as Computer Science) is not. Engineers need to have a crapload more vareity of skills that that of a programmer; in fact, simply graduating from an acreddited university does not mean you are an engineer. You must further write a series of exams and have a certain amount of inspected and monitored in-the-field experience to become and engineer.

    Even in the commonplace usage of the word "programmer" and "engineer", there is a serious distinction. "Programmers" deal with software and the like. "Engineers" deal with the hardware.

    PS. You didnt answer me question: "What do you mean by dual capacity?"
     
  5. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

    Ok I apologise for offending you by getting my progrmmers and engirneers mixed up. The term Dual I mean so you can store twice as much info as a normal DVD.
    (4.7GB x 2)
    Can u please link me to these full DVD Backup Programs?
     
  6. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Oh no problem :) (I just kinda get touchy over the Programmer/Engineer thing cuz I'm a hybrid of both, I'm Software Engineering lol) Personally I dont know of the DVD Backup Programs you desire but perhaps the DVD forums might be able to help?
     
  7. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

  8. deago

    deago Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Ha ASH,
    Don't look now but what software does this forum support ?
    DVDXcopy can help you loads.
    Why don't you buy some,It's GREAT !!!!!
     
  9. deago

    deago Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Are you talking about the BLUE Laser DVD ?
    Sony came out with it but it costs 17,000 dollars ?
     
  10. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    If i'm not mistaken, all DVD drives are blue lasers now... they used to be yellow-green but i think they've all made the transition to blue.... (dont quote me on this)
     
  11. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

    DVD X Copy is another
    1)rip it
    2)reduce quality
    3)Burn it without menus and at reduced quality

    I'm lookin for more of a
    1)Rip entire dvd
    2)Reduce nothing
    3)Keep Menus

    or even just keep the menus PLZ help
     
  12. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Erm... again leaving my area of relative expertise but have you looked into CLoneDVD?
     
  13. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    Praetor
    If you want to get technical the DVD lazer is about 635nm,(635-650) which is about red in colour. The CD lazer is around 780nm(770-830) also may be seen as red. The human eye is rated at 400nm to 700nm, but some can see up to 800nm.
    What ashlvsya probally wants is Blu-Ray. These discs can hold a lot of information and use 405nm lazer and holds upto 50Gb a single disc side. So the engineers are helping you. Dual capacity in my opinon was not a good idea, can cause reading problems and can not be burnt (cann`t have a layer opaque in whant to read through it)._X_X_X_X_X_[small]I am not a number
    I am a Free Man[/small]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 23, 2003
  14. deago

    deago Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Thank you Prisoner;
    You are exactly right. The price of BLUE is coming down but it will take awhile for it to be in my price range ,about $300.00 instead of $13,000.00 .
     
  15. deago

    deago Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Say Ash;
    I think you are getting mixed up between DVD X copy and the infamous DVD X copy Xpress.

    DVDX copy gives you menus and all the xtras and will give you a choice as where to put everything.Good Luck on your mission.
     
  16. unwanted

    unwanted Guest

    deago you appear to be right thanx
     
  17. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    6,011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Dual layered DVD's can be bought, but cannot be burnt too, so it is irrelevant. They need to be pressed, so you really need to be making a lot of copies of the same disc to warrant spending the money on the pressing machine.

    Oops, i quoted you, too late now :)

    All DVD Drive lasers are actually red and have been for some time. The difference between DVD and CD lasers, is the intensity of the burn and the focusing of the lens. DVD lasers can burn pits 6 times smaller than CD lasers.

    Blue laser systems such as Blu Ray are out in Japan, but you are talking a couple of thousand £'s for them and they are not accepted by standalone DVD players. They can burn pits that are up to 12 times thinner/smaller than DVD R, with a data tranfer rate of somewhere around 36Mbits a sec. Sony are bringing out a similar system with a data transfer rate of around 9Mbytes a sec, twice as fast as blu Ray (72Mbits/sec).

    ***Note: i said 36MBits for Blu Ray and 9MBytes for Sony (bytes = bits x8)***

    Blu Ray and other HD DVD devices are being looked at for replacement on the current systems used today, by the DVD Forum. It is hope that backward compatiblitiy will be achieved, where you can still play your old DVD's on the new systems, though a dual laser system will be available.

    The Sony system will start with 23.8GB discs and aim to have 50GB discs available by middle of 2005. The future is 100GB discs in an un-specified time. The models can be bought right now for $3,000 and support a Ultra-wide 160 SCSI interface. The price expectancy on the DVD media for them are to be around $45 each, so its for any of you real loaded bast*rds who can afford that sort of money. However, it is really aimed at the professional market so i expect it willl be businesses or such that are using them.

    Plasmo has also announced a Blue laser system coming into effect very soon with 30GB disc cappacity and the future aim of 60GB and 120 GB within ten years.

    For any or you technical wizards here is the actual difference in technical terms between Blu Ray and current systems:

    [bold]DVD-R[/bold]

    Parameter Ver 1.0 Authoring use General use
    Number of Sides 1 or 2 1 or 2
    Capacity (GB) 3.95 4.7 4.7
    Recording method Organic dye layer
    Laser wavelength 635/650nm 635nm 650nm
    Min pit length (microns) 0.44 0.40 0.40
    Track pitch (microns) 0.80 0.74 0.74
    Laser wavelength 635/650nm 635nm 650nm
    Pre-pit addressing increment increment decrement
    Serialisation for CPRM No Yes
    Pre-recording No Yes
    Track format Wobble pre-groove
    Modulation & error correction 8 to 16 & RSPC

    [bold]Blu Ray[/bold]

    Recording capacity: 23.3GB/25GB/27GB
    Laser wavelength: 405nm (blue-violet laser)
    Lens numerical aperture (NA): 0.85
    Data transfer rate: 36Mbps
    Disc diameter: 120mm
    Disc thickness: 1.2mm (optical transmittance
    protection layer: 0.1mm)
    Recording format: Phase change recording
    Tracking format: Groove recording
    Tracking pitch: 0.32um
    Shortest pit length: 0.160/0.149/0.138um
    Recording phase density: 16.8/18.0/19.5Gbit/inch2
    Video recording format: MPEG2 video
    Audio recording format: AC3, MPEG1, Layer2, etc.
    Video and audio multiplexing format: MPEG2 transport stream
    Cartridge dimension: Approximately 129 x 131 x 7mm

    Now doesn't everyone feel really educated about the future of DVD. You must have missed my thread on the future of DVD.

    :-( My fingers are sore typing all that. Im not proof reading it so dont be nasty abnout spelling and missing words :)

    Chris
     
  18. Prisoner

    Prisoner Guest

    If I missed it, now I have it. The thing I noticed was your repeat of 635/650. I think you mean 635nm for authoritative and 645nm for general (I think that is what it is or in reverse). Thanks for the info on Blu-Ray, it still looks to be in development. Some of the product specs I read have it with similar lazer tilts so new Blu-Ray readers should be able to read DVD.

    Between DVD and CD the reason for the smaller pits is the wavelength advantage (smaller wavelength, smaller size allowed). From what I have seen the smaller the wavelength, the larger the intensity needed. A compromise between low energy for high wavelengths and high energy for low wavelengths. But now I am geting into the lazer science, and that would take lots of time to explain.
     
  19. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2003
    Messages:
    6,011
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    116
    No, you have it in the right order. The 650nm was the original specification for the DVD R 4.7GB. It may well be 645nm now, im not o sure.

    I wonder what HD DVD system will be the future.....
     
  20. Praetor

    Praetor Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Messages:
    6,927
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Thanks for the lecture, I took down everything you said ;-) Hmmmm.... so right now are are absolutely no yellow-green laser DVD drives?
     

Share This Page