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dvd best before date?

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by hkphooey, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. hkphooey

    hkphooey Member

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    from what ive learnt on these forums dvds burnt today might go-off in laymans terms and not play sometime in the future.
    but when do they start going-off ?
    does it start when they leave the production line
    or
    from first their burn date

    lets say, you buy 100, burn dvd_1 today,
    2 years later, it don't play,
    are the blanks left over nearly dead too?

    no jokes please about only burning one a week :)
     
  2. cobra747

    cobra747 Member

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    I have DVD movies burned at least 5 years ago,
    (with DVD Express)still are perfect and I now burn
    with Apollo or Dvd Shrink.they are the fastest....
     
  3. sadsac

    sadsac Guest

    I'm by no means an expert, but I really don't think you need to worry about this. From what I know, your dvds don't have a shelf life. What you're probably referring to is that after you've viewed them hundreds of times, they may or may not play in the future. If you buy good quality media, the disks will probably last a lifetime.
     
  4. cobra747

    cobra747 Member

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    you are right sadsack
     
  5. cobra747

    cobra747 Member

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    if you let them get too hot, they could have a separation effect of the layers which could render them useless.........
     
  6. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    Expected longevity of dye-based DVD-R and DVD+R discs is anywhere from 20 to 250 years, about as long as CD-R discs. Some dye formulations (such as phthalocyanine and azo) are more stable and last longer, 100 years or more, compared to 20 or 30 years for less stable dyes.

    The phase-change erasable formats (DVD-RAM, DVD-RW, and DVD+RW) have an expected lifetime of 25 to 100 years.

    In all cases, longevity can be reduced by poor quality. Poor quality pressed DVDs may deteriorate within a few years, and cheap recordable DVDs may produce errors when recording or may become unreadable after a while (6 months or less)
     
  7. hkphooey

    hkphooey Member

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    ok cheers, very informative, i was only gonna get TYs after reading forum, hadn't realised the longevity diff could be so big

    just out of curiosity if the 100 said dvdrs were real cheap crapola, they're already 'going-off' pre-burn, yeah?
     
  8. Lennaert

    Lennaert Member

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    It is know that the Phicyianne Dye has longer longetivy, however TY does not use that dye !! Mitsui does! TY was inventor of Cyiane, but this dye isnt the one with longest live! That's why i cant understand why so many people go for TY. (I didn't really choose yet, but i think i will go for mutsui)
     
  9. squizzle

    squizzle Active member

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    on some of my movies I watch more often, they started to not want to play in my player after about a year. But I think this might have just been my player, as I've been able to play them on other players. I just reburned and was fine.
     
  10. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    Could you be so kind as to tell us where you got that information from?
     
  11. DogBomb

    DogBomb Regular member

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    I heard that as well that the Phy-blah-blah-cyanine dye lasts the longest, and that Mitsui's Gold CDs had a lifespan far greater than other discs because of their proprietary method. Verbatim boasts about the longevity of their media in their brochure specifically because they use the P-cycanine dye in their CDs and DVDs. I'm sure you can find the blurb on Verbatim's website.
     
  12. Lennaert

    Lennaert Member

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  13. Lennaert

    Lennaert Member

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  14. Lennaert

    Lennaert Member

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    The following section is from EMTEC:

    When CD-Rs were first introduced, disks coated with phtalocyanine dye (gold) had better stability and recording characteristics. However, cyanine dye technology has progressed significantly. The archival stability of cyanine dye has been greatly improved and cyanine dye-coated CD-Rs (greenish-blue & blue-silver) can now be recorded at 1X to 8X writing speeds. These enhancements have made cyanine dye disks the best price/value alternative and the current market choice.

    Octave Systems says...

    Pthalocyanine dye is superior to the Cyanine dye used in other CD-R products for two reasons. One, Pthalocyanine dye is far more stabile than Cyanine. The information recorded on a Mitsui CD-R will last for over 100 years. Cyanine based products might last 20 years. Secondly, Pthalocyanine dye is optimized for use in higher speed writers such as 4X and 6X.

    This success is due to the accuracy with which laser light is able to create "pits" in the Pthalocyanine surface. Pits etched into Cyanine-based disks at high speed can be shallow or poorly defined, resulting in a poorly written disk.

    Pthalocyanine has outperformed Cyanine in a series of tests when subjected to light, heat, and dampness. These test results below highlight the difference.
     
  15. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    Thanks Lennaert :)

    My friggen server here at work won't let me look at those links right now though? I guess I will have to check them out when I get home..
     

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