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DVD BURNING PROBLEM

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by Ace_7, May 5, 2007.

  1. Ace_7

    Ace_7 Member

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    Heya fellahs, my question is how can I prevent quality loss after I burn a DVD movie? I use DVDFab. I have noticed that the DVDs I burn are around 6 GB, how is that possible? I thought DVDs can only hold up to 4.7 GB, unless theyr dual layer DVDs which I doubt they are. I think the DVDs im burning are being compressed so that they fit on my 4.7 DVDs, hence the quality loss.
     
  2. TY4ever

    TY4ever Regular member

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    You can removed some unnecessary subtitles,languages,trailers and some special features if you don't really need them.I don't know if DVDFab can do it but DVD Shrink and CloneDVD can handle that.


    Vincent.
     
  3. laddyboy

    laddyboy Regular member

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    There's a couple of issues and choices here.

    The first is just to backup the main title onto a single disk. Many, if not most, of the main titles will fit onto a single disk with little or no compression required. If you want the extras as well, some software will allow you to back them up to a separate disk. Some software allows for splitting the entire disk over 2 single-sided disks. You can also just selectively omit "extras" you don't want or need like subtitles, foreign language soundtracks, etc.

    A second issue is compression itself. There are many methods of compression. In "shrinking" and existing DVD video, one is removing pixel information from file to reduce the file size. This can be done by randomly selecting pixels, sampling the picture to determine which to remove, or using a strategy like removing pixels in the background or around the edges. Different compression methods will yield different results. Generally compression isn't noticeable at all at levels of 90% and above. For many titles, one would be hard pressed to see much difference from the original when the resulting compressed file is at 80% of the original. Below 80% one will start to notice differences for some titles. Even then, if you use a good compression program that removes pixels unlikely to trigger an eye response like background and border pixels, compression levels of 60% may be acceptable. Lastly, some titles start off with a higher level of picture quality and encoding than others when mastered. Applying the same level of compression to different titles will yield different results.

    Bottom line, if you're using DVD5 disks, just backup the main title to preserve the maximum picture quality.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2007
  4. Ace_7

    Ace_7 Member

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    Ok I appreciate your responses, but can someone help me understand why the DVDs I burn are around 6GB?
     
  5. laddyboy

    laddyboy Regular member

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    Most commercial DVDs are mastered for DVD9 media. DVD5 media holds roughly 4450 MB of video data.

    I assume when you say the dvds I burn are 6GB+ in size that you're talking about the originals. If not you aren't shrinking your content to fit a DVD5. Are you using DVDFab Decrypter or DVDFab Platinum? The former is a ripper only, the latter a reauthoring program as well as ripper.
     
  6. Ace_7

    Ace_7 Member

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    So the original 6GB+ DVD movies are dual layers afterall, mmm...so the only way I can burn them preserving the quality and all the extras (menu, features..etc) is by burning it on a DVD dual layer

    let me get one thing straight. Dual layered DVDs are also known as DVD9 no?
     
  7. laddyboy

    laddyboy Regular member

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    Yes.

    DVD5 = single layer
    DVD9 = double layer

    As noted above, most main movies/titles will fit on a DVD5 with little or no compression. Longer movies are the exception but even DVD Shrink using advanced processing will yield a very acceptable picture. Programs like DVD Rebuilder do an even better job when higher levels of compression are needed.
     
  8. Clone69

    Clone69 Guest

    i use roxio version 7 but not updated those dvd that have 7. 6 or 6.5 of stuff this program will do it & on 1 cd yes thats right 1 cd you just have to dycrpte the movie
     

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