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DVD file structure question

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by Deadtenor, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. Deadtenor

    Deadtenor Member

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    I have some xvid and mkv file formats of movies. I like to use ConvertXtoDVD to turn it into a DVD player friendly disc. I tend to not use the disc to full capacity though-- a typical 90 minutes movie will only use up half the space on a DVD-5 disc. I have been using PowerISO to modify the disc to add a extra folder to the base directory of the disc called "original" and I dump the xvid movie on there. So the base directories of my DVD disc look like this:

    AUDIO_TS
    VIDEO_TS
    ORIGINAL

    The last folder is the one with the xvid file. The problem is my Xbox 360 will not recognize the disc: I suspect it's because the DVD/UDF file structure is broken but I am not 100% sure. If anyone can confirm this I would appreciate feedback. But bonus points if you can give me a solution to get the best of both worlds: keep the DVD file structure AND have the original source file (xvid, mkv, etc.) on the same disc.
    I realize there is a video quality loss with converting from one format to another but it's a convenience factor. If I take a movie to a friend's house and they don't have a device that can play an xvid it creates a little problem.
     
  2. attar

    attar Senior member

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    'JACKET_P' (if applicable) is the name of the folder containing cover art;perhaps that would be acceptable.
     
  3. ps355528

    ps355528 Regular member

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    This sounds like a poweriso problem (and it has many) .. what you should do is ditch the .iso format from CX and save as files.. then add your "extra" directory when burning as a straight data disk.. As things stand you are adding a directory into the disk structure between the audio_ts and video_ts directories on the physical structure of the disk during the burn.. and some (not all) dvd players won't like that..
    When we have pulled this stunt before (interactive picture editing educational course dvd's with examples) we have either done "positional" burning OR called the extra directory "xtras" so it happens after the video_ts directory on the physical disk layout.
     
  4. Deadtenor

    Deadtenor Member

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    Unfortunately, burning them without poweriso and using the folder convertx created still gives me the same problem.
     
  5. attar

    attar Senior member

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    Do you have a standalone player that plays the DVD OK (I don't think it will notice the ORIGINAL folder with the AVI).

    Does the XBox accept the disk if the ORIGINAL folder is omitted.

    I don't have an XBox, but a hybrid disk with DVD folders and an AVI file will only play the AVI on the PC.
     
  6. Jigen

    Jigen Regular member

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    Adding files to a folder with any name you choose works with dvd players, so that's not your problem, Deadtenor. As Attar suggested, test this disc on a real dvd player. I'm going to guess that it's the xbox that's not liking what you've done.

    Unless you have a good reason for your situation, it just doesn't make any sense to convert your avi and xvid to DVD to play on the 360. Just burn a bunch of files to a data disc and put it in to play it. MKV would need to be converted to mp4 but most times this take only a few minutes because you do NOT have to transcode the video. Doing it this way will save you bucketloads of time converting movies to DVD format, and then wasting discs by using only half.
     

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