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DVD-R nominal capacity

Discussion in 'DVD±R for advanced users' started by Mago2005, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. Mago2005

    Mago2005 Member

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    I'm using a LITE-ON DVDRW LDW-411S to backup my movies.
    After having to throw away like a dozen DVD-R's because of nasty pixelation and strange freezes on the movies, I changed the write capacity to 4.38GB, and now all is well.

    I don't get it!! Isn't the 4.38 nominal capacity the norm for a 4.7GB DVD-R ?
    What might be causing this capacity problem here??
     
  2. Ppower

    Ppower Regular member

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    DVD's only have a max capacity of 4.38 it is not 4.7Gb. Depending on your brand of media 4.38 may be too high. The outer edge of the dvd surface can be unstable to write on with some brands. Depending on what software you are using you might want to lower the output to 4.32Gb or so.
     
  3. Mago2005

    Mago2005 Member

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    Thanks for the answer.
    Well 4.38GB works just fine for me, but all the software comes preset for 4.5GB. It got me wonder if the blank media I was buying was poor, but then, having bought Verbatim and Maxell, DVD_Identifier also says their nominal capacity is 4.38GB.
    So, what should I look for if I want a real 4.7GB DVD-R ?
     
  4. Ppower

    Ppower Regular member

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    I have never seen a true 4.7Gb dvd media
     
  5. Ppower

    Ppower Regular member

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    If you take the capacity of the disc and divide by the decimal way (1000) you get 4.7, this is wrong. You must divide the binary way of (1024) to get the true 4.38Gb.
     
  6. Mago2005

    Mago2005 Member

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    Why would the label say DVD-R 4.7GB ??
     
  7. fasfrank

    fasfrank Active member

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    That is how they apparently do it in most of the countries that manufacture DVDs. (x1000) And if anyone comes along and states on their DVD packaging a capacity of 4.3 GB, then the average consumer is gonna buy the one that says 4.7 because they think it holds more.
     
  8. bilbo65

    bilbo65 Regular member

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    Marketing, marketing, marketing.......
     
  9. Mago2005

    Mago2005 Member

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    OK. I understand now.
    The problem I was having was related to overburning.

     
  10. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    here are the stats from an earlier post:

    cgram7
    Newbie
    29. August 2004 @ 13:26 Keep in mind that manufacturers quote the capacity of a writable DVD disc in decimal (base 10) rather than binary (base 2) notation so a 4.7 GB disc stores 4.7 billion bytes [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1000 = 4,700,000 KB ÷ 1000 = 4,700 MB ÷ 1000 = 4.7 GB] . Expressed in binary notation (as is typical with CD-R, CD-RW and most operating systems) the same disc has a capacity of roughly 4.38 GB [4:700,000,000 bytes ÷ 1024 = 4,589,844 KB ÷ 1024 = 4,482.27 MB ÷ 1024 = 4.38 GB] .
     

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