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DVD-RAM

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by willyelk, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. willyelk

    willyelk Member

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    Is DVD-RAM on its way out? Not many DVD players/recorders or burners talk about it. All I was wondering is it important to look for a burner or DVD player that is compatible?
     
  2. mrman

    mrman Regular member

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    They are a very good media type for dats because they can be rewritten almost unlimited amount of times as aposed to dvd-rw which get worn out over time. I have a dvd burner that can record onto them and i also have a set top dvd player that can play them. So once in a while i will burn a movie onto one if im not sure about something or i just want it for a short period.
     
  3. Higgsbsun

    Higgsbsun Regular member

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    DVD-RAM is a phase-change random access format, it is largely sold in double-sided 9.4Gb cartridge form. Being phase-change and totally enclosed it is very resistant to damage, many people in imaging use this media to store archival material and it is claimed to be good for 100,000 re-writes.

    Until recently the media was very expensive as it was vitually a niche market, but the main producers of the format, Panasonic, decided to use it in their range of consumer DVD recorders. Because of the random access it is possible to "time slip" recordings on DVD-RAM recorders, ie watch the beginning of a recording while it is still recording the end, many people find this convenient. With the introduction of the format to mass market, the price of disks has plummeted.

    As for burners, you're virtually restricted to the Panasonic MultiDrives, they do DVD-R as well, but they're slow and expensive in this mode compared to NEC and the like.

    I've been using DVD-RAM and it's ancestors, the LF optical range for ten years now, I've never had data loss.
     
  4. willyelk

    willyelk Member

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    Thanks very much for the info. It was very helpfull. I am new at all this and there is alot of information to learn. I am very interested in digital video recording, editing and backing up movies. I have a VHS colection of 200+ movies. They take up alot of space, DVD are alot thinner. Also interested in video taping on stage performances ect. so if there is anything you people can add or tell me I would be very greatfull.

    Thanks
     
  5. DogBomb

    DogBomb Regular member

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    I responded to someone over a year ago who was considering buying a DVD-RAM recorder last year. My answer? Don't! It is a proprietary format by Panasonic (and not widely supported) and you won't have the ability to play it on non-Panasonic players. What happens when your Panasonic DVD-RAM player breaks down and you've got 100 DVD-RAMs but nothing to play them on? Just ask people with Sony minidisc players or 12" laserdisc players. ;) There is nothing wrong with the format; in fact, it is better for editing. But Betamax was a better format than VHS. Tell that to Betamax owners now. :)
     
  6. Higgsbsun

    Higgsbsun Regular member

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    While I agree with you regarding buying a DVD-RAM recorder for domestic video use, the position of the format is very different to the VHS/Betamax debacle. As I mentioned, DVD-RAM was in use for professional image storage long before it was pressed into use for video. At work we have three generations of DVD-RAM drives and fully expect at least the next two to be compatible with all of our oldest DVD-RAM disks.
    Even when Panasonic no longer make DVD-RAM video recorders, they will still be a market for DVD-RAM PC drives and media.

    At the moment there is no competeing product for archival image storage. If I'm backing up a DVD movie, sure I'll use a TY DVD-R, but storing irreplacable images for 40+ years - give me an error checking phase-change disk in cartridge any day of the week.
     

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