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Faster DVD Shrink Encoding....

Discussion in 'DVD Shrink forum' started by salvara85, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. salvara85

    salvara85 Member

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    Im just wondering if there is any way I could get faster encoding rates, on my laptop.
     
  2. johnl123

    johnl123 Regular member

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    Make sure all of your drives have DMA mode enabled, here's a guide if needed:

    http://www.onthegosoft.com/dma_setting_nt.htm
    or
    http://www.burstcopy.com/dma/xp/

    Doing a full movie backup can result in longer transcoding times, to cut down on the time it takes to backup the movie, you could reauthor the movie to backup just the main feature cutting out all the extras. Here's a guide using shrink to do just that:

    http://www.jlathamsite.com/dvd/DVDShrink3.htm

    Having a faster processor and/or more RAM also helps.


     
  3. garmoon

    garmoon Regular member

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    How fast is your CPU? Encoding is processor intensive.
     
  4. PacMan777

    PacMan777 Regular member

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    I understand what you mean, but there is a difference between encoding and transcoding. Shrink is a transcoder, Cinema Craft Encoder (CCE) is an encoder. Moving on... John and Garmoon both make good points. The hardware needs to be in order and the software housekeeping needs to be up to date, i.e. defragging, cleaning windows cache, cookies and whatever, cleaning out adware and running the AV, plus the occasional reg cleaner. Don't run anything in the background that isn't necessary. You need ample resources, enough hard drive space and RAM so you don't start paging. Since the job is CPU intensive, the faster the better. Updating the hardware can get a bit expensive, so keeping the system tuned is the best solution to have best encoding times without making an additional investment. How you decrypt and burn can make some difference, along with whether you use the Quality Settings or not. Most often insuring quality adds time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2007

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