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File formats

Discussion in 'Convert DVD to another format' started by Paddya, Jul 13, 2014.

  1. Paddya

    Paddya Newbie

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    Hi,

    I have a few movies in MP4, AVI and MKV. Just wondering what is the best format for storing keep the best 1080P quality and either DolbyD or DTS. Some seem to be a couple of Gb with Dolby Sound whereas others are 8-10Gb.

    Would like to find some software to reprocess them all to the same format and saving space where possible.
     
  2. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    container type is down to personal preference,it also depends on what devices you intend to play them on & whether your using old hardware on occasion regularly,if all your devices support mkv it would most probably be best to use that container followed by mp4 & avi only if you have too

    the size of any of those movies you have is down to who ever originally encoded it, an 8g or more movie file would've come from a movie on a br disc,would in all likely hood have pass-thru audio (1:1 same as original ),the extra size is down to video to give the best picture possible by comparison audio is very small in size

    as for reprocessing i can't help as the time required makes it not worth while & what i needed to do to attempt to create what i wanted it was faster just to recode my dvd's to the size i wanted

    the trick is making the video large enough to give a decent picture & for me keeping the audio unchanged,for a dvd dl of 8gb i'd use vidcoder to convert it to a 3.2gb mkv to 3.5gbmkv which for a sd dvd is quite good qaulity,as for a movie on bluray 3gb is ok however i usually go for what you have stated 8-10gb the quality is outstanding video wise however it does mean i'm more hard on what i keep & delete because of the sizes
     
  3. Paddya

    Paddya Newbie

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    Ok thankyou. So it sounds as though stripping the extra languages isn't really going to give much of a saving. I'm playing the back through a new Panny Smart TV and plays the MKV files well so I'll leave it as that.

    I did start a test with Bigasoft Total Video Converter the other day to strip out the languages but got bored when I saw 2 films were going to take 4 hours :) I may give vidcoder a go though as to be honest I don't see much difference in quality between an 8Gb MKV and a 2Gb one
     
  4. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    bitrate ,the higher it is the better the quality an 8gb will have more clarity & detail than a 2gb,it would be like looking at halo 2 on the original xbox compared to halo 3 on a 360 or a game from a ps2 vs ps3
     
  5. Paddya

    Paddya Newbie

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    Never liked Halo :)
     
  6. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    I don't take kindly to anyone who doesn't like my beloved halo so tread carefully :p
     
  7. Mez

    Mez Active member

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    I will add to the good info already provided. Formats do not matter IF the format has enough bandwidth to faithfully preserve your source. Bigger is better since the formats you mentioned are all highly compressed. Just because you can't see a difference does not mean they are the same. With video you need to figure you may be using a bigger screen in a few years.

    What you store it on will determine how long your files will be readable. If you want to use them for more than 5 years you can't use an optical storage for the archive. You need to keep an archive on a HD. Verbatims are best but even they have a failure rate of better than 1% over 5 years, the rest range from 10-20%. The slower the dye (max burn rate) the slower they degrade. For instance, Verbatim 8x fail at about .1% in 10 years while 16x fail at better than 2% in 5 years. I am near the end of backing up a large collection to HD and I am upset how poorly they all lasted. This may sound crazy to you now but you will not be happy if a valued what ever shows up as an empty disk in only 2-3 years. That is a real possibility if you have enough disks. I wish I knew a way to recover the data on an 'empty' disk since your computer 'thinks' the disk is blank. Verbatems fail to blank while the others fail faster but you have a ghost of a chance to recover the data since the computer know there is a disk in the drive.
     
  8. samiapple

    samiapple Newbie

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    To preserve multi-track audio, copying Blu-ray/DVD to MKV is the top consideration for the compatibility and excellent video quality of MKV. Backing up Blu-ray/DVD to MKV can keep AC3 DTS 6 channels, which give you a whole lot better in the realm of audio.
     
  9. Nepheler

    Nepheler Member

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    All are container format, but if me I would choose lossless MKV as it can remux soft subtitles (not those hard encoded ones) easily.
     

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