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File Sharing on Network

Discussion in 'Windows - General discussion' started by stutz10k, Mar 28, 2007.

  1. stutz10k

    stutz10k Guest

    My desktop pc connects to the internet wirelessly thru my wireless router. What I am wondering is when my girlfriend connects to the net at my place on her laptop, how can she access the files on my computer? Thanks for your help
     
  2. mrcapdown

    mrcapdown Regular member

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    right ok to start

    to shere the folder
    u need to right click the folder u want to share
    then click properties
    then click the sharing tab
    then check share this folder on my network

    to get to the file u have shared
    go my computer
    on the left my network places
    and the folder should be there

    let me no if this helps
     
  3. stutz10k

    stutz10k Guest

    Thanks for your help, but what if she just wants access to everything on my PC?
     
  4. mrcapdown

    mrcapdown Regular member

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    i dont think it can be done u could share the c drive but i dont think it will let u
     
  5. joe777

    joe777 Member

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    Set up Remote desktop on yer missus notebook, that way she can have access to everything. START - ALL PROGRAMS - ACCESSORIES - COMMUNICATION - REMOTE DESKTOP. Have a go and post back if you need any help matey. I run XP pro and I believe the home version is different, so any probs, post back
     
  6. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

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    You can share an entire drive just as easily as a folder; just right-click your hard drive(s) in My Computer and select the Sharing tab. Windows will give you a warning about the risks associated with sharing an entire drive but it will let you. There also historically have been directory-traversal vulnerabilities that allow an attacker to access the entire drive even if only a sub-folder is shared, and I believe some still exist.

    Also understand that when you're sharing wireless, your PCs are essentially unfirewalled to each other on the network, so if you aren't running forced encryption (encryption is required to connect) and using a PSK (pre-shared key), an attacker can access your files (or run attacks against your PCs) as easily as if your PCs were physically wired together, since they are all on the same network and are inside the router's firewall.
     
  7. joe777

    joe777 Member

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    When sharing files on your home network you will also have to configure your Software firewall to allow access. The comment above does not make much sense to me at all. When you share files then you will have to configure your software firewall, to allow connections from the other pc's IP. Also if your wireless access point/router can be configured to accept only the mac addresses you want then you can secure your connection even more. Although mac cloning is possible, I strongly recommend entering the mac address of each pc, and you can limit the amount of DHCP this is a proccess that gives the IP addresses to your pc's
     
  8. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

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    The problem is that by placing your LAN in a "trusted zone" (or whatever your firewall calls it), you essentially disable the firewall for that network range. In order for NBT (or any IP traffic for that matter) traffic to make it through a PC firewall, turn off stateful inspection of the LAN IPs that will be sending it; thus, you are essentially unfirewalled. BTW, MAC spoofing is very easy to do, so MAC registries are of very limited value. Software like SMAC has long been available to do this.
     

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