1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

HELP! NOOB! NEW TO PC (please)

Discussion in 'PC hardware help' started by w33dman, Mar 21, 2005.

  1. w33dman

    w33dman Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Hi, I'm new to the whole PC stuff. I was wondering if you could simplify it, by answering these few questions I have. Please.

    1) What is a hyperthreading processor?
    2) What is PCI?
    3) What is a BUS?
    4) What is a processor?

    Answer any question please. And THANK YOU for ur help.
     
  2. p4_tt

    p4_tt Active member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2005
  3. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Messages:
    39,072
    Likes Received:
    80
    Trophy Points:
    128
    1: CPU's have execution pipelines; basically an on- chip cache of instructions to execute. Often, to increase speed, CPU's will have multiple pipelines.
    Some operations cause what's called a "pipeline stall" - the CPU has to wait for, say, a floating point operation or a memory read. the CPU COULD be doing other stuff. Hyperthreading is something Intel cooked up to use those "stall slots" in the execution pipeline to run multiple threads while the CPU would otherwise be stalled.

    2: Short for Peripheral Component Interconnect, a local bus standard developed by Intel Corporation. Most modern PCs include a PCI bus in addition to a more general ISA expansion bus. PCI is also used on newer versions of the Macintosh computer. PCI is a 64-bit bus, though it is usually implemented as a 32-bit bus. It can run at clock speeds of 33 or 66 MHz. At 32 bits and 33 MHz, it yields a throughput rate of 133 MBps. Also see PCI-X and PCI Express. Although it was developed by Intel, PCI is not tied to any particular family of microprocessors.

    3: A collection of wires through which data is transmitted from one part of a computer to another. You can think of a bus as a highway on which data travels within a computer. When used in reference to personal computers, the term bus usually refers to internal bus. This is a bus that connects all the internal computer components to the CPU and main memory. There's also an expansion bus that enables expansion boards to access the CPU and memory.
    All buses consist of two parts -- an address bus and a data bus. The data bus transfers actual data whereas the address bus transfers information about where the data should go. The size of a bus, known as its width, is important because it determines how much data can be transmitted at one time. For example, a 16-bit bus can transmit 16 bits of data, whereas a 32-bit bus can transmit 32 bits of data. Every bus has a clock speed measured in MHz. A fast bus allows data to be transferred faster, which makes applications run faster. On PCs, the old ISA bus is being replaced by faster buses such as PCI. Nearly all PCs made today include a local bus for data that requires especially fast transfer speeds, such as video data. The local bus is a high-speed pathway that connects directly to the processor. Several different types of buses are used on Apple Macintosh computers. Older Macs use a bus called NuBus, but newer ones use PCI.

    4: Short for microprocessor or CPU.






     
  4. w33dman

    w33dman Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    P4_tt, and DDP, you guys are great help man. Thanks a lot!
     
  5. p4_tt

    p4_tt Active member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    2,207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Thats wot we here for m8, anytime.
     

Share This Page