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How to Build a New Custom PC Without Touching a Screwdriver

Discussion in 'Building a new PC' started by ireland, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Build a New Custom PC Without Touching a Screwdriver

    We love building our own computers but it takes quite a bit of time. If you love to build but find you don’t have the time, a custom-built PC still gives you control over your components, while leaving the actual assembly up to someone else.

    When considering a new computer, you can buy, build, or just get a laptop. Either way, buying a PC or laptop is pretty easy while building you own computer is akin to anything else that takes care and assembly. There’s a process – research, gathering, assembly, testing – and and while you can certainly research and gather in tandem, you can’t do anything else until you have all the parts.

    Altogether, it can take a considerable effort because when it comes right down to it, you’re spending money and you want the best computer for your budget. You don’t simply want to buy the first components that pop up in your search results.

    READ MORE HERE

    http://www.howtogeek.com/219729/how-to-build-a-new-custom-pc-without-touching-a-screwdriver/
     

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  2. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    that is an old isa modem. they haven't made those in almost 15yrs.
     
  3. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Lol, so it is! I wonder where they find these stock photos sometimes :)

    Isn't that whole article basically an advert for Cyberpower? One of my main issues with that site was that unless you specified otherwise, the machines came with generic no-name PSUs that went pop in short order. Really, those things shouldn't even be an option to include.
     
  4. Mez

    Mez Active member

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    Greetings to the 3 of you. DDP very impressive I wouldn't have even looked but then I didn't read the article. I usually do use a screw driver and I usually ask Sam Morris or this forum for hardware suggestions. He has never steered me wrong. Being a programmer I don't keep up with hardware. I also use a local mom and pop computer store to set my jumpers. Since the price of home-mades have gotten pricey my last is at least 5 yrs old. The writing on the MOBO is too small these days and they check my work before they turn it on. The last time I built one the charge was $50. The price goes up if you screwed up too much. Great insurance for so cheap.
     
  5. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    It can be a handy fallback if you have that sort of capability - despite having built a system myself, when one of them went horribly wrong about 10 years ago due to a cheap PSU going bang, at the time it was just easier to have someone else deal with the problem and establish what was/wasn't toast without taking any safety hazards. It's not something I'd do now, but back then, £40 to have someone test every component and make recommendations was very useful. Sadly stores like that nowadays aren't always so easy to find.
     
  6. ddp

    ddp Moderator Staff Member

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    mez, I didn't read the article as I thought I recognized the card so I looked at the picture & found I was right.
     

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