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How to Enable HDMI-CEC on Your TV, and Why You Should

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by ireland, Jan 16, 2015.

  1. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Enable HDMI-CEC on Your TV, and Why You Should
    “HDMI-CEC”, short for HDMI Consumer Electronics Control, is an HDMI feature many TVs and peripherals have. This feature makes your devices work better together, but is often disabled by default.

    To make things even more confusing, manufacturers often don’t call this feature “HDMI-CEC”. Like with Miracast, every manufacturer wants to call it their own branded name, even though it’s an interoperable standard.

    Why You Want HDMI-CEC
    HDMI-CEC allows devices connected to your TV through HDMI ports to communicate back-and-forth with your TV. The devices can have some control over the TV, and the TV can have some control over the devices. This means you could control your Blu-ray player through your TV remote, for example. Or devices can automatically change your TV’s input when they need to do something.

    For example, let’s say you have a Chromecast connected to your TV, but you’re not using the Chromecast right now. Instead, you’re watching TV, using a game console, or you just have your TV on another input for some reason. With HDMI-CEC, you can start casting to your Chromecast from another device and the Chromecast will send a signal to the TV, forcing the TV to switch to the Chromecast. You won’t have to fumble with the TV’s remote control and switch to the appropriate input on your own.

    HDMI-CEC also has advantages with game consoles. For example, with a PlayStation 4, you can press the button on the controller or the game console itself to bring the game console out of rest mode. When you do, the PlayStation 4 can automatically switch the TV to the correct HDMI input, saving you the trouble. Or, if you switch the TV to the PlayStation 4 input while the PlayStation is in rest mode, the PlayStation will understand you want to use it and automatically power on. Unfortunately, neither the Xbox One nor the Wii U supports HDMI-CEC at this time.

    Devices can also label their inputs, so your Chromecast will automatically appear as “Chromecast” instead of just “HDMI 2.” Yes, you can generally type in your own label, but the device can do it for you when you use HDMI-CEC.


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    http://www.howtogeek.com/207186/how-to-enable-hdmi-cec-on-your-tv-and-why-you-should/
     
  2. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    Should You Get an “Ultra HD” 4K TV?

    anufacturers are pushing “Ultra HD” 4k TVs hard here at CES 2015. By the end of 2015, half of all TVs in stores may be 4K TVs. They’re cheaper than ever, too. So, when should you buy one?
    4K isn’t exactly a gimmick like 3D TVs a few years ago or curved TVs now. They offer a clear benefit — more pixels in a smaller area, which means a higher-resolution with more detail.

    What 4K Is, and Why You’ll Want It… Eventually
    The argument for 4K is very clear. It’s higher resolution than “full HD” (1080p) televisions. This is achieved by packing more pixels into a smaller area. Smartphones, tablets, and laptops are all gaining higher-resolution screens. 4K TVs are just TVs with similar high-resolution displays.

    A standard full HD TV you’ll buy right now has a resolution of 1080p, or 1920×1080. A 4K TV has a resolution of 3840×2160. It’s named 4K because a 4K panel has about four times as many pixels as a 1080p TV, and since it’s nearly 4000 pixels wide, they call it 4K.

    More pixels just results in a richer, more detailed image. If you’ve seen a recent Apple device with a “Retina” display or another competing smartphone or tablet with a high-resolution display, you’ll understand. But smartphones, tablets, and laptops benefit more from this because your eyes are closer to the screen. At common TV sizes and viewing distances, the improvement isn’t quite as extreme.

    GO HERE TO READ MORE
    http://www.howtogeek.com/206662/should-you-get-an-ultra-hd-4k-tv/
     

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