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I need help fixing A scanning problem while using Avi-synth in AVSEdit

Discussion in 'DivX / XviD' started by Rikoshay, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. Rikoshay

    Rikoshay Regular member

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    Please don't kick me off if someone already asked this, but I don't if someone else has this type of question, and I don't want to look for an answer. I have started using Avi-synth for about a month now, and I do think that this is a very effective and rewarding way to make the movies because there is no extra time used up for creating the movies using the filters in Virtual Dub from the frame-serving method of VFAPI. I have a problem fixing a pure-FILM movie I have. It seems that the c-frames (Interlaced) have a very unpleasing horizontal after-effect that seem to have no solution to remove. I've tried just about every filter that has to do with de-interlacing, and the only thing that slighty made it less noticable was Field-Deinterlacer. Sould I try a different filter, or is this not the problem. Has anyone else have this problem, or did i do something wrong in the encoding process. I am currently using the newer method, using the DG thing, you know the DGIndex and the DGDecode thing that the GK Rippack has, but I didn't get it from that. I followed some of the things that the happyuser had in his "The True Way To Make DivX" and filled in some of my own stuff. Hopefully you will guys will have the answer, but if not, could someone tell me where I would find an appropriate forum like doom9 or the avi-synth webpage? Thank You. L8ter.
     
  2. The_OGS

    The_OGS Active member

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    This is a problem most people backing up a DVD can avoid for ages - and then there it is, right in your face - an interlaced source ;-(
    In NTSC-land, progressive film is 24fps.
    Interlaced video is 30fps.
    Telecined film is also 30fps, and this can be the problematic one!
    If you have interlace @ 30fps, you need to determine exactly what is going on.
    A pure interlace (from a DV camcorder or whatever) requires de-interlacing. The product will be 30fps.
    A telecined source requires IVTC. The product will be 24fps.
    Using what used to be called DVD2AVI (now called DGIndex) to generate a *.d2v project file in GordianKnot, you can then examine the *.d2v file using notepad.
    Telecined content is identified by a repetitive 4:5 pattern, where the 4th frame is duplicated to convert the original 24fps content to 30fps.
    GordianKnot serves the video to VirtualDubMod, using AviSynth.
    If you preview the video from the D2V using AviSynth, you can see the Telecine going frame-by-frame.
    It will manifest itself as progressive-progressive-progressive-interlaced-interlaced.
    IVTC corrects it back to 24fps; beautiful :)
    True-interlaced 30fps actually has the potential to make a crappier AVI!
    I use the Field-Deinterlacer, as you describe.
    Once you ID your source, you will know exactly what must be done.
    Some films are progressive, with telecined opening & closing credits, and interlaced animation/computer graphics inserted in the middle. :-(
    This is why DGIndex will rarely show 100% video type, it's usually something less...
    If you want some more-technical reading, look here:
    http://www.doom9.org/video-basics.htm
    And here and here:
    http://www.doom9.org/synch.htm
    http://www.doom9.org/idct.htm
    Hope this helps,
    Regards
     
  3. Rikoshay

    Rikoshay Regular member

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    Yes, I get what you mean, but is their a filter that creates it within AVSEdit? I'm not at my house right now, but I could get an answer by the time I get There, if your not busy. Do I need to get a filter for it? Please tell me. Thank You. L8ter.
     
  4. Rikoshay

    Rikoshay Regular member

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    Hey, I figured it out! What you said was true, it was right in my face. All I had to do was retrace my steps. The thing was, when I made the .d2v project file, I didn't think that I had to change the movie to Forced FILM, because it was already. But, I put it in Forced FILM, did everything like before, but left out all the filters except UnDot, put Fast Recompress In VirtualDubMod, 3 1\2 hours later, I got a really good DivX copy on my computer. Well, thanks for writing me back, I really appreciate it. L8ter.
     
  5. The_OGS

    The_OGS Active member

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    My pleasure :)
    You seem fairly knowledgeable Rikoshay,
    I wouldn't recommend something like AutoGordianKnot to you (for the same reason I wouldn't recommend DoctorDivX).
    But, take a look at the latest full-manual GordianKnot
    http://www.afterdawn.com/software/video_software/video_encoders/gordian_knot.cfm
    By acting as a GUI for the programs you are using now, it will enable you to make superior backups using advanced error-correction capabilities between the component parts.
    Plus, if you do the audio first (manually) as I do, you then point GKnot at the audio file, telling it how you plan to interleave, and after asking for any other small files (codec pkgs etc) you intend to burn with the backup, GKnot will select the exact bitrate to produce 700MB.
    I use it to produce triple-pass rips with DivX 5.2.1 (overnight).
    Needless to say, the quality is outstanding...
    L8R
    _X_X_X_X_X_[small][​IMG]

    ABIT AN7 nForce2 Ultra 400
    XP2500+ Barton @ 3200+
    2 x 512MB PC3200[/small]
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2004

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