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Is it safe to write on dvds with a regular fine point Sharpie?

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by Nick39891, Jun 17, 2007.

  1. Nick39891

    Nick39891 Member

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    be gentle :)
     
  2. 300bowler

    300bowler Regular member

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  3. Nick39891

    Nick39891 Member

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    OK I was just thinking..I heard that some markers have chemicals that can damage it.

    but Sharpie seems like the kind of brand that wouldn't do that to the innocent *.*
     
  4. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    Supposedly there are chemicals in a standard Sharpie that can eat through the surface of a CD-R. Whether or not this is true I've never been able to determine to my satisfaction. However, blank DVDs have an extra protective coating that CD-Rs don't, meaning that even if it is true for CD-R it's still not for DVD+/-R.
     
  5. aabbccdd

    aabbccdd Guest

    sharpies are fine for both DVDs and CDs won't hurt a thing
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 18, 2007
  6. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    Sharpies are fine, I have used sharpies on 90% of my DVD's and 100% of my CD's. I have even accidently wrote on the data side of a couple of CD's (don't ask) and guess what they still play just fine even after several years. I probably should re-burn these music CD's but hey i am cheap and they still play so I say what the heck!
     
  7. JaguarGod

    JaguarGod Active member

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    Wow, you actually got it to play after writing on the data side? You can probably clean it off with rubbing alcohol. Trying copying it first, then try cleaning it and run it through CDCheck or a similar program to see if it affected the readability. Not sure if Alcohol can damage discs...

    Yeah, sharpies are good. I eat them for breakfast!! I think 99.999% of my DVDR are marked with Sharpies. The other .001% is unmarked/DVDRW.
     
  8. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    Yeah I listen to the one music CD in my truck all the time with no problems :) So I am just saying I don't beleive the sharpies effect the disk at all. Give it try on a CD write on the data side and then play it you will be surprised!
     
  9. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    Actually writing on the data side doesn't necessarily tell you anything. The story about Sharpies goes something like this (I read the original source some time ago).

    It's possible for the ink in some markers (not just Sharpies) to eat through the protective coating that sits directly behind the reflective foil. If that happens it's only a matter of time before the foil gets damaged and creates an unreadable spot on the CD. There can also be problems with very fine point pens as they can scratch the coating off while you're writing.

    The data side actually has an extra protective layer over the dye, so they're actually not only more resistant to markers, but also to scratches, on that side. As far as reading a CD with marker on the data side, that just means the ink doesn't stop the particular wavelength of light used by the laser.

    My understanding is that DVDs have an extra protective coating between the visible (label-side) surface and the foil, so even a marker that would eat through the printing on a disc wouldn't expose the foil.

    Edit: I found this post from Hydrogen Audio that gives much more information in a much clearer manner than I ever could.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2007
  10. bbmayo

    bbmayo Active member

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    well vurbal no disrespect to you or the person that wrote that, but I guess anyone can make a bunch of assumptions on what could or might happen, but I have been using markers to write on music CD's for 12 + years and I still have some of those that play perfectly fine with no issues so I guess until I see these effects myself I just won't beleive them. :)
     
  11. aabbccdd

    aabbccdd Guest

    me to bbmayo never a problem after years of doing it
     
  12. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    I use a Papermate CD & DVD Marker (posh Sharpie to those that don't know - lol).


    No problems yet w/ any of the hundreds .. nae thousands previously done :)

    There is of course always the risk of disk-rot :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD_rot
     
  13. sorrow93

    sorrow93 Regular member

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    I used a big fat artline permanent (graff style) on my early burns and some of those did fail me I now use the proper pens on cdr's but as others have said this should not matter to dvdr
    I play it safe by using cd/dvd markers on all my burns now
    this failure applied to my audio burns they started skipping so I cannot say anything for data burns
    (and the discs had no scratches and stored at best and skipped at the same precise moment each time)
     

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