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iTunes fairplay burning

Discussion in 'Audio' started by HelloWrld, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. HelloWrld

    HelloWrld Member

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    I was browsing the iTunes store recently, and found dozens or tracks that I would like to get, all dance, or obscure remixes, so getting them on P2P is out of the question. My question is, when you burn an album, WAV files are all built the same way, no encryption, no fairPlay. If you burnt an album, and then ripped it....would the result be mp3's without DRM. Would it be possible to simulate this with an image drive? Is there another way to remove DRM?
     
  2. nuclear81

    nuclear81 Member

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    Unfortunatly not (atleast not to me knowledge) You can't just magically turn off DRM for conversion reasons. Unfortunatly every time you reencode a file (music or movie) the quality will drop by about half. So going from WMA to WAV to MP3 will result in a pretty crappy sounding audio file compaired to the original.
     
  3. pdg

    pdg Member

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    DVD Jon has created a program which bypasses the DRM stage of the downloading process when purchasing songs from iTunes. One still pays for the tracks, and FairPlay is not included. Download here: http://fuware.nanocrew.net/pymusique/
     
  4. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    HelloWrld,

    When you create a CD using iTunes and the music that you purchased your resualt is a DRM-less CD of tracks. iTunes gladly lets you burn your bought music to a regular audio CD. There is no need to convert them yourself.

    With that CD you can infact rip the tracks to DRM-less anything (Mp3, WMA, Ogg< MPC, ect.). Apple lets you do what you want to the tracks that you pay for. Its call your Fair Use Rights! Apple's DRM only prevents pirates from converting the files directly into something else and most importently from sharing the file with people that are not close friends or family.

    Ced
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 19, 2005

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