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larger dvd-r discs?

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by gwoo, Oct 10, 2003.

  1. gwoo

    gwoo Member

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    Hello,

    I have a good question for all of you.

    Are dvd-rs going to increase in size. I remember back when the standard CDR was 74 min then increased to 80 Min and now you can get 99 min discs.

    Are DVDRs ever going to progress the same? Can they
     
  2. sly_61019

    sly_61019 Senior member

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    i highly doubt it, but they are comming out with duel layer dvdr discs.
     
  3. Discmania

    Discmania Active member

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    By definition dual layer means up to 9gb of recording space.
     
  4. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Dual alyer will be 8.4GB/8.5GB discs, but you will need new burning hardware and software for it. However, Blue laser systems will be available at a similar price hopefully within the year, so i would rather go for them with 25GB+ space, than a dual layer disc.
     
  5. VinylPush

    VinylPush Member

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    I really think that dual-layer DVDR's are going to take off in a big way. Consider the market forces involved. Virtually 1:1 movie backups? There's going to be an awful lot of demand pushing hardware and media prices down.

    I can see blu-ray being a very slow starter. It will mean more hardware upgrades for your PC. Not just a new reader/writer, but your hard drive also (120GB will hold fewer than 5 blu-ray discs).

    I'm also guessing that blu-ray recording speeds are going to top-out at somewhere over the 40MB/sec mark (16X DVD is about 20MB/s, assume blu-ray pit-length is at least half of DVD), meaning you'll be wanting a well-tuned machine to host your blu-ray recorder.

    Personally, I'd be looking to use a SCSI system in a blu-ray authoring machine. ATA/SATA would work, but would be prone to interruptions from user activity (loading IE, opening an email) with inevitable buffer underruns. Of course, a 'burn-proof' like system would safeguard your recording, but we all know that burn-proof activation can introduce its own errors*.

    DVD-R (dual and single layer) is going to be around for a very long time. We've got 16X recorders to look forward to, dye improvements, cheaper consumer video recorders, cheaper portable players and perhaps even slight increases in capacity.


    * I copied a DVD from a network shared DVD-ROM, which unfortunately could not quite keep up with 4X reading (until about 60%). The pretty pattern introduced onto the recording by the constant activation of the burn-proof system is quite interesting..._X_X_X_X_X_[small]--
    Anyone seen my bitch?[/small]
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2003
  6. Discmania

    Discmania Active member

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    It's all pie in the sky mate. People are not going to change all their hardware and PC specifications just to accomodate dual layer discs when making a 1:1 DVD copy is already here (albeit with a little compression). If you'd studied economics you'd also know that if demand goes up so does the price!
     
  7. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Of course, the Demand/Supply curve. I do expect people to change their hardware. I for one will be as soon as blue laser becomes viable. For people like me with large screens who demand the highest quality, it is needed and compression isnt an option. Even a DVD that isnt compressed needs to be progressively scanned to look anyway high quality on my 60 inch screen.
     
  8. Discmania

    Discmania Active member

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    Yes well, big is beautiful and all that. Personally I can't tell the difference on my 32 inch.
     
  9. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    I can tell the difference on anything that is compressed by around 10% even with deep analysis on our 32" Pansonic. I hope HD DVD will become a reality soon and i hope it will be in a form of supporting DVD-R playback also. This may mean dual units in a DVD Standalone
     
  10. VinylPush

    VinylPush Member

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    I reckon people will change their hardware, but not very fast.

    Guys like Mr Oriphus will obviously be taking advantage of the latest and greatest. Guys like me (poor working-class folk ;-) ) are going to stick with standard stuff for a time.

    As for the comments re demand/supply. If that were always the case, why do DVD-R's not cost $5 each?

    Competition is rife, which is driving the prices to the floor. Same happens with RAM (until they start with the whole price fixing bulls**t).

    Same will happen with dual layer DVD-R. Not so sure about blu-ray. Blu-ray is going to be aimed at pro-sumers, not your average OEM pre-installed device.
     
  11. Discmania

    Discmania Active member

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    Well actually some brand name discs still do cost $5 but it is true that competition will drive prices down but it will take quite a while and to start with when demand rises prices stay high since companies want to make as much profit as possible. The only reason prices come down is because more businesses want a share of the market and that also usually means compromises on quality. I still think changes will be very slow with this new technology - it is not automatic that the demand is there as the case of picture-messaging mobile phones have proved.
     

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