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Lcd burn in? is it possible?

Discussion in 'HDTV discussion' started by duality15, Jun 30, 2007.

  1. duality15

    duality15 Member

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    I recently got a toshiba regza 42" lcd tv, after a month I noticed that there's a tiny maroonish dot on the screen. I thought it was some dirt or dust but to my surprise it was something internal or somethings gone wrong with the screen. I thought burn in isn't logically possible on LCD tv's ? Is this something else? if so is this permanent or something can be done to remove it, It's extremely annoying even if its only the size of a grain of sugar. Appreciate your replies. Thanks in advance...
     
  2. b18bek9

    b18bek9 Regular member

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    well there are known cases of LCD's gettin burn ins but its rare comapred to plasma's....but i was wondering if its a dead pixel or pixels or burn in.....
     
  3. duality15

    duality15 Member

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    It could be a dead pixel... what could have been the cause, and is there any chances of reviving a dead pixel?
     
  4. diabolos

    diabolos Guest

    No, LCD TVs can not be burned-in. It does sound like a dead pixel. No it isn't fixable.

    -Ceddie Ced
     
  5. res2cue

    res2cue Guest

    if it's only a month or two old it's still under warranty. Call up Toshiba and see what they say.
     
  6. kringles

    kringles Regular member

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    Hi duality15,

    See this this link;

    http://lifehacker.com/software/lcds/fix-your-lcds-dead-pixels-152062.php

    for suggestions on fixing 'stuck' (colored) pixels. Note it is titled incorrectly since 'dead' (black or white) pixels cannot be fixed as stated by 'diabolos'. But 'stuck' pixels can sometimes be corrected via software programs that display rapidly changing colors to the affected pixels;

    http://udpix.free.fr/

    or the pressure method mentioned. I would suggest the software fix first befor trying the more agressive pessure methods mentioned. I have used the 'udpix' program sucessfully to 'unstick' a green pixel on my LCD. If your TV has a vga (pc) input you can hook up your laptop/desktop pc and give it a try. An overnite run should be attempted.

    You can contact your manufacturer but they usually require a number (~5 to 8) of bad pixels before replacing a unit.

    good luck
     
  7. garmoon

    garmoon Regular member

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    @diabolos

    I, too, thought that it was impossible to get burn-in on an LCD screen. WRONG! When I got my Samsung 40" LCD in small print in the manual it warns that you shouldn't leave the same picture on the screen for more than 2 hrs. Burn-in was possible and would NOT be covered under warranty. The fact that LCDs were not supposed to be subject to burn-in was the prime reason I got the LCD over plasma.
     
  8. Xpressor

    Xpressor Regular member

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    hmmm you guys would know....

    my 60in SXRD
    in SD 4:3 i keep the pic w/in the black borders, i cant stand
    stretchin' the pic. would the black borders (3inches on each side)
    eventually affect my SXRD?
     
  9. garmoon

    garmoon Regular member

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    @Xpressor

    I don't stretch my 4:3 picture either-black bars on the ends. Since the pixels are not lit (black color), I would assume there could be no burn in. If there was, then not many plasmas could sustain watching a three hour 4:3 image w/o burn-in. I'm not 100% sure tho; so I defer to diabolos, cuzz I know he knows. This would also apply to the top black bars in DVD letterboxing.

    Edit: I just thought of another question. Since most of TV fare is in 4:3 and thus doesn't fill the entire screen, the pixels that are doing the work of showing the 4:3 image: will they wear out faster than the end pixels that are used much less? Anyone??
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2007
  10. SupremeRe

    SupremeRe Member

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    Actually, LCDs do not reprduce true blacks. It is grey when off. The screen is actually firing up those pixels to get them black-ish. That's partly why plasmas are better at reproducing blacks.
     
  11. Spenman91

    Spenman91 Regular member

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    Some LCDs could not get burn in at all. Such as computer monitors, because if they did, you wouldn't think that company would sell too many monitors. I'm really not sure if LCD can actually get burn in or not. I'm just trying to consider other displays that have the same image on them for long periods of time and aren't affected.
     
  12. Xian

    Xian Regular member

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    Yes, it is possible to have burn in on LCD. For most people it will not be an issue, but I have seen several servers that have the same image up on the monitor have that image burned in. Of course I am talking very long timeframes, a month or more sitting there with the Windows or Novell login.

    Here is an example picture of an LCD with a persistant image:
    http://www.widescreengamer.com/articles/lcd_image_screen_burn_on_dell_2005fpw.html
     
  13. Spenman91

    Spenman91 Regular member

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    Yeah, but no one here would leave anything on their TV that long. So what types are impossible to get burn in on, CRT, Rear projection, DLP? I'm not sure after reading about LCD getting it.
     
  14. res2cue

    res2cue Guest

    I don't think there ar any that are absolutely immune to burn in, if you leave it on long enough.
     
  15. Spenman91

    Spenman91 Regular member

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    I could have sworn DLP and CRT was, but then again, I also thought LCD was too until I read this. As I said I don't think anybody will be stupid enough to leave something on it for days straight or anything.
     
  16. Latin124

    Latin124 Guest

    After a Month with a Sharp 32" 1080p I notice a lit pixel in the middle of the screen, I am not sure if is a dead pixel or a lit pixel.
    all I now is disturbing to see it also when the cable HD box is on as well, I called Sharp and report it and I am waiting for a tech. to drop by to see my set. It not image burn in , is a tiny pixel lit all by it self...
     
  17. Spenman91

    Spenman91 Regular member

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    I'm looking at getting a new TV soon, after reading this, I might have to go with DLP or SXRD.
     
  18. Krillen

    Krillen Guest

    Yes, this is really starting to suck. After years of having an amazing Toshiba tv, i got a new 42hl67 and it was great out of box.
    After 3 weeks though, now, it's got stuck pixels poping up all over.
    I have 3 red, 2 blue, 5 green, and, i think a yellow is about to develop.
    I can actually watch each pixel get stuck.
    This is horrible.
    Everyone download a Toshiba Manual and turn to Page 6.

    http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/tacpassets-images/models/42HL67/docs/32hl67u_e.pdf

    So, now, when you call them, they will recite the part of the manual where it claims that non working LCD cells are a structural property of LCD and is part of normal operation and is NOT COVERED UNDER YOUR WARRANTY. If you ask for that person's supervisor, THEY recite this part, smoothly, like its an actual part of conversation. After escalating this to the supposed Manager of their Customer Service division, he says I can have a service technician come out and see if it has a real problem, like this is in my head. I made him painfully aware of my familiarity with how LCD is made and functions,and told him that their warranty notice is fully of fallacy and is a lie. I am very tempted to review this with my lawyer, but, not yet. Everything would be retroactive due to my acting already to attempt resolution.

    The LCD Panel is the main operating part of the tv, hence, LCD TV. Non working cell structures are DEFECTIVE. Defective is defective!!!
    They also claim these pixes are not visible from a normal viewing distance. I spotted the first few (more have arrived since) while watching Batman Begins. Worse for Toshiba, there is a PC input on this device, and the PC Viewable area is much smaller than the size of the screen itself. This endorses a close viewing distance for a normal funciton of the panel, as you would assume the ability to read Text on a PC Input operation. If you can read Text, individual Pixels are gonna stand out like a sore thumb. So, if any number of individual cells failing won't affect my picture, then, apparently, if half my tv pixels failed, then, under their warranty, as printed, my television is NOT DEFECTIVE AND NOT ELEGIBLE FOR REPLACEMENT.
    I will say several of my friends have Regzas and have no dead pixels (we check these things). The ones I saw in store, DIDN'T have dead pixels (you know how often those screens just go black but still have signal, so, you can check them then. I would think a company with a relatively low defect rate that is trying to convince the world that their HD format is better even though it has less bandwidth and storage than Blu Ray wouldn't want to build up ill will by having their defective TV's be a burdon on a customer. What use is HDDVD if my TV from the same manufacturer has CRAYOLA FLECKS all over the thing.
    I am sadly disappointed by their customer service and warranty.
     
  19. SupremeRe

    SupremeRe Member

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    That disclaimer is supported by just about the entire LCD industry. Many have a number of dead pixels you must reach before they consider it less. I won't name names but some require 12 dead pixels, anything less being normal. That's why I bought an extended warranty for my Samsung.
     
  20. Krillen

    Krillen Guest

    Those are useless too. Most extended warrantees require 30 or more, just incase yours stops at 30.
     

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