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LOTS TO READ AND How to Edit Your Minecraft World In-Game and On-the-Fly with WorldEdit

Discussion in 'Windows - Games' started by ireland, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Edit Your Minecraft World In-Game and On-the-Fly with WorldEdit


    While the primary allure of Minecraft is building there are some tasks that are quite tedious and practically beg for a copy and paste button. WorldEdit is that button (and so much more). Read on as we show you how to supercharge your building with an in-game editor that gives you editing tools that turn your Minecraft world into a canvas.

    Why Use WorldEdit?
    You can always edit your Minecraft map (construction and destruction is the basic premise of the game after all), but the basic in-game tools make big edits extremely time consuming. Moving an entire mountain or digging a channel between oceans could take weeks of real-time effort. Today, we’re taking a look at in-game mods that give you god-like building powers which turn mountain moving into a simple project.

    Why do you want to use this tutorial? Because some things in Minecraft are just too agonizingly tedious to deal with the old fashioned way, especially when there’s a better way.

    Take for example the way water behaves in Minecraft. In the real world if you have a pond next to a river and you want to link the two then you simply dig a channel between the two bodies of water and physics does the rest (assuming the bodies of water are on an even elevation, the water just flows between the two and levels off).

    In Minecraft all sorts of weird things happen in the same scenario. If your channel is more than a few blocks long, for example, the water from the pond will water fall into the channel, the water from the river will waterfall into the channel, but the two bodies of water will not level themselves and merge together like real bodies of water.

    An in-game editing suite allows you to quickly correct annoying quirks like this and so much more. Look at the lead image of this tutorial for an example of another task that would be insanely tedious. In the screenshot we’ve encased a tall cottage in a giant hollow ellipsoid of glass. The amount of time it would take to get that perfectly right by hand (calculating it, mapping out the layers needed, and then placing all the glass blocks) would likely take days. By using a simple one line command we were able to create the shape in a matter of seconds (and just as quickly remove it once we’d snapped the picture).

    With that in mind, let’s take a look at how we can add editing tools to Minecraft that allow us to spend way more time building and having fun, and less time doing tedious tasks like trying to level and fill a canal.

    Installing WorldEdit
    WorldEdit comes in several flavors. You can install it via Forge for Minecraft 1.6.4. and you can install it via LiteLoader or Forge for Minecraft 1.7.2 and 1.7.10. Installation is as easy as putting the appropriate litemod or jar file in your instance or server’s /mods/ folder.

    In light of that, rather than go over the process again (as the process is the same as any other mods) we’d encourage you to grab the right file for your Minecraft version number and then follow along with our Minecraft modding tutorial here.

    Using WorldEdit
    Once you’ve added World Edit to your single player game or to your server, it’s time to get your hands dirty. Before we do however, let us assure you that WorldEdit is going to take a little bit of study to really master. It’s likely the most complex mod you’ve used to date, and it’s significantly more powerful (and command loaded) than your typical Minecraft building experience.

    There’s a huge amount going on under the hood of WorldEdit and you can use it for so many different tasks. We don’t have the space here to look at everything it can do, but we can take a peek at the tasks that new World Edit users want to jump right into using.

    Copying and Pasting
    Let’s look at a very simple use case to get our feet wet. Remember the pair of Mooshroom Islands we found in our AMIDST tutorial? Let’s say we had the crazy idea to build a giant bridge between them in order to unite the Mooshroom herds. Anyone who has played any amount of Minecraft knows exactly how tedious building a bridge, especially a detailed one, over the span of hundreds of blocks of water would be.

    Wouldn’t it be nice to just copy and paste a chunk of the bridge like we’re using the Clone Stamp tool in Photoshop? With WorldEdit, we can easily do that. Here’s our starter segment, we built the first chunk of the bridge so we can clone it and reuse it.






    GO HERE TO READ MORE


    http://www.howtogeek.com/203024/how...-world-in-game-and-on-the-fly-with-worldedit/
     
  2. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Render Your Minecraft Creations in 3D Glory with Chunky



    If you’re looking for a way to 3D render and preserve your favorite Minecraft creations, big or small, as beautiful images then look no further than Chunky. Whether you want to immortalize a whole city or a tiny cottage, it’s the right tool for the job.

    What is Chunky?
    In a previous Minecraft tutorial we showed you how to render your entire world map into a Google Earth-style interactive map with Mapcrafter. If you’re interested in a more up-close and personal render than MapCrafter can provide, however, you need Chunky.

    Where MapCraft renders your Minecraft world in totality across all available chunks, Chunky renders a tiny portion of your Minecraft world in very high detail, so it’s a great tool for really showing off a build you’re proud of.

    Further, you can really dig in with Chunky and set a wide variety of options unavailable in Mapcrafter: you can use custom texture packs, set the time of day and angle of the light, adjust the light sources, and otherwise tweak the render options and appearance of your rendered chunks to achieve a perfect look.

    Installing and Configuring Chunky
    Visit the Chunky website and grab the most current cross-platform binary bundle. There is a Windows installer but the binary bundle is a universal Java installer and just as easy to use. Extract to a well labeled folder and run the chunky.jar file.

    The installer will prompt you to pick a location:



    HERE TO READ MORE

    http://www.howtogeek.com/202993/how-to-render-your-minecraft-creations-in-3d-glory-with-chunky/
     
  3. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Select a Remote Minecraft Host

    You read over the local-host server guides, you even set up a local server (or two), but you’ve realized that your home network isn’t fast enough for you to share your server with friends. No worries, today we’re taking a peek at the world of remote Minecraft hosts.

    Preparing to Pick a Host
    Before we even begin to delve into the subject, the first thing we would suggest is becoming very familiar with the ins-and-outs of running the local server on your network before jumping into paying for and dealing with a remote host.

    The degree of tech support offered by different hosts ranges from hand-holding to completely DIY so it really helps to know the tools you plan on using pretty well before diving into managing a remote Minecraft server.

    The knowledge you’ve acquired via reading our previous Minecraft tutorials, as well as the knowledge you continue to build up by playing with the servers you’ve installed, exploring plugins, etc., will prove very useful when comparing hosts and setting up your first remote server.

    Unlike previous tutorials where we guide you through an explicit step-by-step, this lesson is focused on familiarizing yourself with the basic terms used by Minecraft hosting sites, the options out there, and how to avoid getting ripped off in the process.

    A final word before we begin: our advice and suggestions are based on the premise that you are a home user who wants to host a remote server so that they and their friends can more easily play. The logistics of hosting a server that will support hundreds of players is beyond the scope of this lesson.

    Going the Official Route
    Before we dive into the myriad of unofficial hosts out there, we need to give Minecraft Realms a big nod. It’s the only official Minecraft host in the world as it’s directly endorsed, hosted, and promoted by Mojang.

    READ MORE HERE
    http://www.howtogeek.com/202978/how-to-select-a-remote-minecraft-host/
     
  4. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Overhaul and Expand Minecraft with Game Changing Mods

    The fundamental allure of Minecraft is the ability to build anything and make the game whatever you desire it to be. Today, we’re taking a look at mods that help you in that endeavor by adding extra dimensions, major game changes, or providing an outright overhaul to the game.

    As we’ve discussed in previous lessons on Minecraft modding, the introduction of mods can greatly enhance your play experience and extend the amount of time you enjoy the game. The mods we’re showcasing here today introduce so much new content it’s like you’re getting a whole new game to play. Even better yet the Minecraft modding community is so prolific that by the time you get tired of one overhaul mod there’s another major one worth playing with.

    Some of them expand the world via extra dimensions and some add in new game mechanics. Others add more realistic needs, physics, or game elements, or overhaul the game completely and offer a brand new Minecraft experience. Finally, there are some that do many of these things in one single mod.

    The Minecraft modding world is vast and full of talented modders pushing the limits of the game in new and creative ways. The following mods are a very small collection of the enormous pool of mods out there. Although we’ve done our best to pick example of the different genres and game-changing mods available it would easily take a book just to cover every unique and novel mod available for the game. With that in mind, we hope you’ll look over the mods here to see the kind of creative things the mod community is up to, try some of our suggestions out, and then leap right into searching for more mods.

    Meet the Mods
    The default game features three dimensions, as we learned in our introductory Minecraft series: The Overworld (the world you start in that resembles our world), The Nether (a hell-like dimension filled with fire, rock, and unique mobs), and The End (a purgatory-like final level where the game’s final boss, the Ender Dragon, is found).

    The following mods either add one or more dimensions to the game, or they heavily modify The Overworld is such a way that the basic gameplay is radically changed.

    Twilight Forest
    Available for Minecraft Version: 1.7.10

    Installation Process: Copy the mod .JAR into your mods folder and run Minecraft.

    Description: Twilight Forest is a beautiful mod that’s part Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, part Alice in Wonderland, and thoroughly magical.

    The mod adds in the Twilight Forest dimension which is accessed by creating a pool of water 2×2 blocks in size, surrounding the edge with plants, and then throwing a diamond into the pool.

    GO HERE TO READ MORE
    http://www.howtogeek.com/202898/how-to-overhaul-and-expand-minecraft-with-game-changing-mods/
     
  5. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Pump the Minecraft Eyecandy with Shaders

    The simple and blocky styling of Minecraft is endearing to many fans of the game, but if you’d like a more sophisticated 3D look with realistic lighting, reflections, and enhanced graphics you can achieve the shimmering 3D paradise you crave.

    Polished graphics are a prominent feature on most modern video games and we’ve come to expect well rendered shadows, beautiful surfaces and textures, and other GPU-intensive flourishes. Any fan of Minecraft can tell you, however, that despite the depth of gameplay Minecraft is short on any of the graphical flourishes found in popular games. Shades can change all that.

    Grass that waves in the wind, water that sparkles and reflects light, a sun that blazes brilliantly down and temporarily blinds you when you leave a dark cave: all these things and more are injected into the game via shaders. Read on as we show you how to pair the sophisticated building experience Minecraft provides with equally as sophisticated graphics.

    Note: A good resource pack pairs very nicely with a good shader. For the purposes of this tutorial, however, to showcase what shaders can do without any extra help we’ve opted to not use a special resource pack and to simply apply the shaders with the default Minecraft resource packs.

    Getting Ready for Shaders
    Before we actually jump into the eye candy that are shaders, let’s smooth the road before us by ensuring we’re ready for the experience.

    Before experimenting with shaders you’ll definitely want to update your computer’s GPU drivers to the latest stable version. The more stable and bug-free your drivers are the better.

    In addition to updating your drivers you’ll also want to ensure that your installation of Minecraft is properly modded with Forge installed. If you’ve dug into this tutorial without reviewing the previous lessons, now is the time to go back and review previous tutorials on modding and instance management to ensure you’re up to speed with Forge installed and ready to go.

    Note: It is possible to install shaders without Forge just like it’s possible to install Optifine without Forge. Given the benefit of using Forge and the great big world of awesome mods out there, however, we’re focusing on the Forge-centered installation for this tutorial.

    Installing the Shaders Mod
    Just like Forge serves as a platform for you to load additional mods, the Shaders Mod serves as a platform to load add-on shaders for Minecraft.

    Visit the official Shaders Mod thread here and download the most current Forge-based version; as of this tutorial it’s GLSL Shaders Mod v2.3.18 for Minecraft 1.7.10.

    READ MORE
    http://www.howtogeek.com/202838/how-to-pump-the-minecraft-eyecandy-with-shaders/
     
  6. ireland

    ireland Active member

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    How to Restyle Your Minecraft World with Resource Packs

    Some people love Minecraft’s 8-bit chunky look, while others can’t believe a game would look like that these days. Whether you want to make Minecraft look chunkier, smoother, or somewhere in between resource packs make it easy to do so on the PC, pocket, and console editions of Minecraft.

    For those of you with a bit of video game experience under your belt, you’re likely well familiar with the concept of “skin packs,” “texture packs,” and “resource packs” as the things have been known over the years and across various video game genres.

    Many videos games have distinct directories and locations within the game’s resource archives devoted just to providing visual and audio assets for the game. Typically, these assets are identified by file name and are not otherwise verified in any way such as by file size or creation date.

    As such, it’s pretty easy in many cases to simply swap one asset file for another asset file as long as the filename remains the same. Let’s say you’re playing an old simulation game like Command and Conquer wherein a simple file like “completed.wav” announces the completion of a new base by saying “Base deployed!” or the like. All you’d need to do to jazz up your experience and say, have the game scream, “Goooooood morning, Vietnam!” in Robin William’s voice, would be to download a .wav file of said clip from the 1987 film of the same name and rename it “completed.wav” to replace the old game asset.

    Minecraft, like many other games past and present, supports resource packs. Let’s take a look at what we can accomplish with them (no game modification necessary).

    Understanding the Terminology
    Before we proceed, let’s clear up the different terms used past and presently, and for different editions of Minecraft.

    Prior to Minecraft PC Edition 1.6.1, the packs were known as “texture packs” because at the time, they simply replaced the surface textures of in-game objects. After the 1.6.1 release they were renamed to “resource packs” because they not only replaced the in-game textures but language packs and audio files as well. Despite the change many sites that catalog and organize resource packs still refer to them (both in the site name and on the site itself) as “texture packs.”

    Be aware that resource packs for the PC edition will list not only the version number of the game they should be paired with but also typically, the resolution of the textures inside the pack. The default texture resolution in Minecraft PC Edition is 16×16 pixels per block-face. Textures can be increased incrementally from that original 16×16 pixel size all the way up to 512+ pixels on a side.

    It should be noted that high-resolution textures are pretty but do increase the load on your GPU as they require more rendering. The 256x texture back seen below on the left half of the screenshot for example, took almost a minute to load on our more-than-powerful-enough gaming PC but offers a significant step up the realism scale from the basic Minecraft look.

    The Pocket Edition supports texture packs, but unlike the PC Edition, there is no way to easily swap them. You have to manually replace the “terrain.png” file in the Minecraft system directory and restart the game to replace the textures. If you want to return to using the old textures, you need to replace the updated texture with the original. We recommend making a copy of the original texture named “terrain.old” so you always have a local backup.

    The Console Edition also supports packs, known as “texture packs,” but these are distributed via the marketplaces and range in price from free to a dollar or two. Be advised that the Xbox Live marketplace is littered with scummy looks-like-a-texture-but-isn’t entries that are actually just wallpaper collections of texture packs applied so shop cautiously.

    With that clarification out of the way, let’s look at where to find texture packs for the PC.

    Discovering Texture Packs for the PC Edition
    As you may recall from our original Minecraft series, version numbers can be quite important when dealing with Minecraft as the game has undergone many minor modifications and several major overhauls in the last few years.

    When browsing resource pack websites or reading forum entries about them, make sure to keep an eye out for what version of Minecraft the pack is intended for (remember, the pack system was totally overhauled between 1.6 and 1.6.1.)

    Before we start recommending sites to visit, let’s highlight one of the cardinal rules of downloading any kind of Minecraft mod (even light non-permanent modifications like resource packs): never download an .exe file (or the equivalent for your operating system) when searching for Minecraft stuff.

    There is no reason for a resource pack to be packaged in any sort of installation file. Resource packs should be .ZIP archives that you absolutely do not need to interact with or install beyond extracting them to your Minecraft folder so that the Minecraft app itself can handle them. It’s unfortunate, but there are a lot of web sites out there that take advantage of Minecraft’s popularity with children to serve up viruses, malware, and other nasty content because the kids downloading it don’t know any better.

    READ MORE HERE
    http://www.howtogeek.com/202617/how-to-restyle-your-minecraft-world-with-resource-packs/
     
  7. Dhokahai1

    Dhokahai1 Newbie

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    Thanks,

    My folder was empty. I think I found the game save data in the game launcher directly.

    Mine was in the UBIsoft game launcher.
     

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