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Magic 5 soldering issue

Discussion in 'PS2' started by trobee, May 16, 2004.

  1. trobee

    trobee Guest

    Is there an easy,...wait, check that, possible way to solder the points to the bottom of the motherboard where there is no traction at all? I keep putting the solder there and the solder will not stick. Is there a trick this? What am I doing wrong, or not doing? And yes, I an using a soldering iron, not gun and high-quality solder.
     
  2. account

    account Guest

    glue gun lol.

    try using some flux and the solder will stick right on there.
     
  3. trobee

    trobee Guest

    sorry, but what is flux?
     
  4. account

    account Guest

    flux is a paste or liquid (depends on wich one you buy) you put a little bit of it on the parts you want to solder and get solder on the soldering iron and then put the soldering iron on the flux and it will cause the solder to stick to whatever the flux was on.

    you can buy it at any hardware store.

    you can also buy it online but its easier to get it from the hardware store (i get mine from radio shack)
     
  5. trobee

    trobee Guest

    Thanks
    Uh, there isnt any chance that i would permanently screw up my PS2 is there? I'm scared now, cause I just screwed up my XBox.
     
  6. account

    account Guest

    yes there is always a chance you'll screw it up but its hard to screw it up since most things are easily removable.

    check your pm (im writing after this message so if you dont have it wait a minute and check again)
     
  7. ShadowNyt

    ShadowNyt Regular member

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    Actually - carefully scraping the top of the point you are trying to solder to with a blade or similar to ensure bare coper is exposed is the best way to do it - saves playing with messy and corrosive flux.

    Also if you managed to kill an Xbox I would hesitate to recommend you continuing further with a PS2 as they are 90% harder to mod than the box...
     
  8. trobee

    trobee Guest

    whoa whoa
    hold up, flux is corrosive?
    like, what do u mean?
     
  9. ShadowNyt

    ShadowNyt Regular member

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    The reason why flux works is that it eats into the surface of the metal you intend to solder to so that clean un-oxidised surfaces are exposed to ensure soldering is easier.

    Problem is that if any excess flux is left on the board and not cleaned off (i.e. adding a second extra step in the proceedure - (add flux, solder, clean off flux)) then it can slowly eat through your very fine tracks over time. This will reduce the amount of copper transferring signals hence increase resistance and voltage drop on the track.

    Depending on how much flux is left - this can potentially lead to unstable operation after 3 to 6 months.

    But if you clean up afterwards then you should not have a problem - plenty of people use flux to make soldering easier - I just have never needed to. (As mentioned most solder has resin cores that release flux as you solder anyway - and in such small amounts that cleaning up is not required).
     
  10. trobee

    trobee Guest

    how do you clean up the flux tho? if its under the solder, how would that work?
     
  11. ShadowNyt

    ShadowNyt Regular member

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    The flux directy under the solder evapourates when you hit it with the heat from the soldering iron - it is more excess flux in surrounding areas that is a concern - especially when using liquid flux.

    This can be cleaned off with a non-corrosive cleaning solvent like ISOPROPANOL - i.e. pure alcohol.
     

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