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MKV or ISO?

Discussion in 'Convert DVD to another format' started by bethefin, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. bethefin

    bethefin Member

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    Using DVD Fab,would I lose much quality burning from DVD to MKV instead of to ISO or would the difference be negligible?
     
  2. xboxdvl2

    xboxdvl2 Regular member

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    an iso file is bacially just an image of a disc so the quality would be basically the same as a dvd might lose a bit of quality if you have to compress the dvd to fit on another disc.The mkvs which i have seen are mostly high definition blu ray rips.if the dvd is standard definition dont see the point in converting it to mkv as an iso would basically be the same as the original.have no idea what it would be like as an mkv.
     
  3. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    Resolution doesn't really have anything to do with the usefulness or appropriateness of MKV. Matroska (aka MKV) became a defacto standard for H.264 video back when Dolby Digital support in commercially developed container multimedia containers like MP4 was pretty much non-existent. Because of that it is also commonly supported on Blu-ray players.

    To answer the original question, I'm not familiar with DVDFab's specific options, but I can tell you that MKV is simply a container format, meaning a specification for storing video and audio. It can store the exact same video, audio, and subtitle streams as the original DVD or it can store them after conversion into pretty much any other format you can think of. What you should be focusing on is whether the video is being converted to some other format which, as I said, I can't tell you.

    As xboxdvl2 said, however, ISO is simply an image format. Think of it like a Zip or RAR file except that there isn't any compression and it's specifically designed for reproducing optical disc file systems. Using a virtual CD/DVD/Blu-ray drive such as Virtual CloneDrive or Daemon Tools you can mount an ISO image and use it in just about any way you could use a physical disc inserted into a physical drive, except of course that it lacks the encryption typically found on the original disc.

    What are you intending to do with the resulting file? If you just want a simple media (ie video/audio/subtitle) file to play ISO probably isn't a particularly good choice. Depending on how you intend to play it MKV may not be either.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2012
  4. bethefin

    bethefin Member

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  5. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    You'll need to consider on what devices you intend to play them on & if you decide to loan any movies out & whether those said devices support mkv ,the more compatible option would be MP4,whether you use x264 or ffmpeg as encoders you more than likely won't see any difference in quality for SD.It would probably pay to look at handbrake or vidcoder both are free if your intending to do mkv,they both have presets as well which you can customize or just setup your own preset,i prefer vidcoder as it will let you set size limit in MB's or GB's whereas the recent versions of handbrake have that option removed (vidcoder is handbrake in another form)

    The best way to decide on which way to go if device playback ain't an issue is cut a segment out say 300mb-500mb then encode it then play it & see how it looks,rule of thumb bitrate determines the quality of the ensuing video
     

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