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Movie length in relation to file size?

Discussion in 'DVD Shrink forum' started by Valkyr47, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. Valkyr47

    Valkyr47 Member

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    Last night I wanted to back up both Wild Hogs and Disturbia. I choose the re-author option because to be honest i actually prefer to just have the movie start playing and I dont like having menu's or extra features.

    With just the main movie i managed to get Wild Hogs on DVD-R with room to spare, so i needed no compression. This is great because obviously the movie quality is perfect.

    I then went to re-author Disturbia, and even with JUST the main movie selected (and only english audio track and english subs) it was using 79.0% compression in order to fit.

    What makes no sense is that Wild Hogs is 1 hour 40 minutes, and Disturbia is 1 hour 44 minutes. If they are both almost identical in movie length, how come one can easily fit and the other has to be compressed? im obviously hoping to get most of my backups in perfect quality.

    The only thing i could think of is that Wild hogs is using the 2.35:1 widescreen, so in effect the actual size of the video is smaller, whereas Disturbia is 1.85:1 so technically the video takes up more screen. Is this the correct answer to why its doing that?

    To be honest im not complaining because even at 79.0% disturbia still came out looking pretty damn good. But my DVD-R says it has a recording time of 120 minutes (2 hours)... im assuming it cant use that full space because of the 350 megabyte audio track? Thats another thing, it really is something with the video because the audio track size on both films is near identical

    Just wanted to make sure im not doing something wrong, i want these to come out good!

    thanks for any help, sorry for the long post!
     
  2. laddyboy

    laddyboy Regular member

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    The studios have to decide how much of the disk is to be allocated to extras vis-a-vis the main title. If they use a DVD5, the extras will usually be fairly small and the movie will be mastered at a bitrate to fit the disk. If they use a DVD9 and there are few extras, the movie will usually be mastered at a higher bitrate and you'll get a very nice main title. If there are lots of extras, the main title will be masttered at a lower bitrate resulting in a smaller file. While movie length is a factor for the size of the main movie files, so are other things like the size of the extras and the size of disk used.
     
  3. cyprusrom

    cyprusrom Active member

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    Just to put it in different words than laddyboy did it...The bitrate determines the quality of the movie-higher, better.With higher bitrate, comes bigger file size.You can have a movie that is 1 hr long, and be lets say 3GB. The same movie, if mastered at a higher bitrate, even though might be exactly the same length, it can be twice as big in GB size. The DVD-R says it will record 120 minutes-however, if you have a high bitrate video, even though the video might be only half an hour long, it might not fit onto the DVD-R.

    Another analogy that might make the picture clearer, lets take the VHS. If you have one scattered somewhere in your home, looking at the package you can see that the same tape,it can hold different lengths videos, depending on the recording mode: SP, LP, ES/SLP. If you record in "standard play"-better quality, you might get 3.5 hoursbefore it is full; the "long play"-lower quality, migh double the lenght.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2008

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