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MP3'S on a dvd-r

Discussion in 'Audio' started by Jorday21, May 1, 2004.

  1. Jorday21

    Jorday21 Member

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    will this disk play in my car mp3 player

    cheers
     
  2. cozza1987

    cozza1987 Guest

    Not unless your Car CD-Player will play a DVD-R disc which is unlikely

    Regards
    CoZZa
     
  3. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    hey cozza 1987 i got a conia dvd player(relatively cheap about $70 aus)it plays mpeg, jpeg, mp3 all on dvd-r.
    If i could get it connected to my jvc mp3 player located in my car would i be able to then play mp3 on dvd-r or is that just going to be a pipe dream
     
  4. cozza1987

    cozza1987 Guest

    I wouldn't put the DVD Player in the car, your likly to stuff the player as well as the disc as the players are not designed for movement while playing.
    And even if it would, i dont think it would work to good.

    Regards
    CoZZa
     
  5. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    so i guess i'm going to have to put a dvd player in my car, currently have the jvc mp3 player but i can only get about 1 to 2 hundred mp3 per disc.

    thought my idea would be a cheap alternative but i forgot that that dvd player wouldnt have a shock absorber.

    catch ya

    andmerr
     
  6. rajugsw

    rajugsw Member

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    I've been cataloging all my CD's LP's, & cassettes to mp3's. I'm using DVD+R's to store everything. Right now I'm using each DVD+R to represent one artist (my collection is huge & over 20 years old). All mp3's are ripped @ 320kbps. Future uses for theses DVD's will be getting a Kenwood 20GB Music Keg for the car & building a dedicated music server(i.e hard drive big enough to hold my entire collection) in my home.

    I cannot tell the difference between the original and the compressed mp3 version of any of the tracks I've been ripping. Screw the naysayer's!!

    Having instaneous access to my music collection is awesome.
     
  7. rajugsw

    rajugsw Member

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    Oh yeah - and they sound great on my Marantz DV4300.
     
  8. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    what are you using to get your LPs to your pc?
     
  9. RCBabcock

    RCBabcock Member

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    If they sound good to you then that's all that matters. I personally can't live with the sound of MP3 even at the highest bitrates and VBR, but I'm more of an audiophool than a computer whiz, and my audio system is pretty resolving.

    I sure hope you are keeping the originals. There may be a time down the road when you'll want better sound; to get it you'll need the originals, as you'll be limited in what you can retrieve from a lossy codec.

    That said, if you listen mostly to pop/jazz/rock, the SQ issues may not be as severe.

    One last thing- some recent issues regarding the longevity of DVD-R/CD-Rs has got me a little concerned. It might be wise to recopy the DVD-Rs you make every couple years.

    I think it's a cool idea transfering all you stuff to DVD. That's much handier than having to clean your LPs each time and mess with a TT. I got really tired of the rituals involved with vinyl...
     
  10. rajugsw

    rajugsw Member

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    All my CD's, LP's & cassettes are being stored in a cool dry location in my home. I'd be a fool to get rid of all this great music.

    It will probably be another 20 years before the music industry, electronics manufacturer's and all other greed monger's decide on a format that will keep file sizes small enough without detracting from the original sources sound quality. I too hated mp3's from what was being downloaded for free off of the web. The pay for music service I use is Real Audio's Music Store and audio quality is not too bad at all. I'll always continue my pursuit for good quality DVD-A, LP, & properly remastered CD's. I've grown to accept the shortfalls of mp3's@320kbps albeit they are slight.

    I've converted my LP collection over to my PC and DVD+R via SoundBlaster Audigy2 Platinum Audio Card. Essentially its 24 bits in , 16 bits out(.WAV). I am currently working on my CD's and tapes.

    BTW - I too was/am an audiophool. Mortage, wife, & kid have forced me and my collection to spend more time in my vehicle & on my headphones via by Audgy soundcard. Gone are the days of worrying about sweetspots, speaker placement, hours of tweeking my cartridge alignment, and all the othe "fun" audiophool rituals.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2004
  11. RCBabcock

    RCBabcock Member

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    That's cool. I don't mean to imply that you don't know good sound; I'm sure you do. And honestly, I'm no pro when it comes to MP3. Most of the encoding I've done has been with MusicMatch Jukebox & the DFX plugins. According to some more 'codec cognicenti' friends this is among the best sounding available. And it doesn't sound bad for casual listening, but it wears on me over time. I'm sure that someone more savvy than me with codecs can probably coax better sound out than I'm able to.

    Don't laugh about the idea of ripping your discs and then selling them- I've known people who've done just that. One of them was on another forum I frequent (okay, I'm an administrator there...) was saying he burned all his discs to CD-R, then sold 'em. WELL, guess what? He didn't use top 'o the line blanks, and now only a few years later many of the discs have failed despite being properly stored. It seems that cheap discs use a very thin coating over the top side, and the cyanine dye is fading, rendering his collection unreadable. Hopefully he can recover most of the music, but that's a sobering lesson for anyone inclined to do what he did.
     
  12. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    rajugsw

    &

    RCBabcock

    i have about 50 singles on vinyl dating
    back about 49years.They are starting to wear and i was wondering the best way to get them to my pc.Once there i can back them up thats no prob.The prob is getting them there.I have heard of a USB turn table but have no more info , what are your suggestions


    thanks in advance

    andmerr
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2004
  13. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    Get a good quality turntable - the best you can afford, and not a technics meat grinder, either. Also, get the best quality cartridge & stylus you can afford too.

    Next, run this through a stereo preamp with Phono inputs. If you aready have one, then great. If not, then you need to find one with Pre Amp outputs. The Cambridge Audio C500 is very good, and there is a phono preamp available for this too.

    From the Pre Amp outputs - never the amplified signal or you will cook your soundcard - run the signal straight into the line inputs of your soundcard, and into the Appication of your choice.
    I can recommend Nuendo, WaveLab or Adobe Audition from personal experience, but there are some great shareware/freeware apps out there too.

    Now you need to declick/decrackle/denoise. The apps I mentioned all have their own built in tools, but if you can get the job done in 14 days, then get a copy of the Waves demo - this has the waves restoration processors, and they are the best thing that waves make to my mind.
    Anyway - get what you can for this. The Audition ones are also very, very good - and there is a 30 day tryout at www.adobe.com for download.

    Record the Audio as at least 24 bit at 44.1 KHz samplerate. When all is cleaned up as best you can, dither down to 16/44.1 and use an audio CD burning app such as WaveLab - it creates genuine Red Book CD's, which a lot of the cheap ones do not. Again, there are shareware/freeware apps that will do this, but I do not know what they are.

    It is well worth going to the trouble, as you will give your old records a new lease of life - plus they will not get any more worn out.

    LOL.
     
  14. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    thanks wilkes (being awhile since you answered my last audio question)

    I take it then that this USB turntable isnt worth persisting with and i think i was also looking at cd creator 6 ( the spindoctor function)
     
  15. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    I personally would not use a USB turntable, as you will be totally at the mercy of whatever converters are in it - and given the price of them, it will not be up to that much.
    What you put into the system will dictatewhat you get out of it.
    Pop down the local secondhand shop, and see what is in there. Chances are you will get a pretty good TT & Preamp.
     
  16. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    thanks for the reply, think i'll 1st do what you suggest but i dont hold much hope over here for good 2nd hand quality parts.I PROBABLY WILL LOOK INTO getting the right equipment but for now i am looking at the info on the programs you suggested.

    later dude

    andmerr
     
  17. wilkes

    wilkes Regular member

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    No worries.
    I'm (usually) always around.
    Feel free to email if necessary, as I do a lot of Vinyl - CD.

    I hate to say it as a confirmed Steinberg user, but there is a tryout version of SoundForge that may also be of help.
    As for the freeware/shareware options, depending on your OS there are various options.
    For XP & a decent processor, there is KRISTAL which is a top editor/mixer, and very under rated. Stereo editors like GoldWave are also good.
    Your biggest problem however are good NR programs.
    The Waves demo is the best, but you are limited to 14 days from installation before it times out, and the restoration bundle is nearly a grand(the only waves stuff I use, personally).

    Anything I can help with - ask away.

    LOL
     
  18. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    wont use xp to unreliable found win 2000 more stable


    Have tried soundforge and have mates who work in the audio field .

    i take it thats not $1000 aussie dollars is it.Price isnt really that much of an issue for me.I work 38+ hours a week.

    Steinberg is it that good!!!!!!!!!!


    i guess you will get a few more questions from me yet

    thanks for the advise

    andmerr
     
  19. rajugsw

    rajugsw Member

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    I've used Nero Wave Editor (full version). It's very fast when having to do volume changes, cutting, and you can insert & paste audio easily.

    The hiss reduction works great but can introduce a "gating noise" during certain passages. Does not remove the "air" around the recording when used properly.

    wilkes is correct. Don't use a USB turntable (if there is such a thing).

    Good luck

     
  20. andmerr

    andmerr Guest

    rajugsw:

    thanks for the info i will keep that in mind.

    As to the other they are available for about $110.oo australian and can be purchased at dick smiths electonic outlets (USB turntable)
     

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