1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Nero And DVD Authoring....Again

Discussion in 'Video to DVD' started by AzraSound, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Hey everyone,
    Okay, I am new to DVD authoring, but I have done a lot of reading on this topic, and I'm hoping I have just missed some vital information. I have burned several video files (*.avi) to DVD-R fine with Nero and they playback well on my standalone DVD player(s). However, when I try to burn a DVD folder (VIDEO_TS folder) it does not work. Burning completes, no errors appear, but it just won't play.

    I have read here and in other forums of different settings to use, such as choosing DVD UDF or DVD UDF/ISO and ensuring I use file system version 1.02, or if choosing ISO, using level 1 parameters and disabling all Joliet options and relaxed restrictions. I do get that message:

    "You have added DVD-Video content to a compilation that will not result in a DVD-Video compliant disc"

    when I try and tinker with the options, but I read that I could ignore it. If I use the default DVD-Video profile with Nero, the message does not appear. I have tried both checking, and unchecking the option that states "Force DVD-Video compatibility mode (required for XBox TM) to no avail. I'm tired of making coasters!!

    Anyways, the other thing to note is that these "failed" attempts play on my XBox (aside from when I do not check the option to force compatibility), just not on either of my two standalone DVD players.

    So, the question is, is it just Nero can't burn these VIDEO_TS folders properly, or am I missing something? If its the former, please offer me an alternative solution as this is driving me crazy!



    Tony
     
  2. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    How did you acquire the VIDEO_TS folder (with it's associated .vob's and stuff inside)?
    Did YOU encode and author it in some program?
     
  3. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    I do not know the source as it was a download. I have tried this with two separate video folders for two different movies and get the same results.
     
  4. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    If you play it in something like PowerDVD or WinDVD, is there audio?
    I would suspect a totally messed up download. Someone probably didn't encode or author it properly to begin with.
     
  5. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Aaah, totally forgot to include that part. It plays fine with the software (PowerDVD) whether it be from the disk folder or the burned DVD. The DVD plays fine on my XBox too. However, it will not play on my Panasonic, which is a couple years old, or my Emerson, which my wife just bought last week. It won't even start. I'll get a disc error or improper disc or can't read disc message.
     
  6. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    In addition, I have used Memorex DVD-R as my media and haven't tried another one yet. Possibly an issue?
     
  7. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Would it be worthwhile trying something like ImgTool when all it does is use the Nero API anyways? If its a Nero problem, ImgTool will probably suffer from the same thing, yes? Could it be the media? Should I try a different brand of DVD-R or should I try DVD+R?
     
  8. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    I seriously doubt your older Panny will play burned DVD's of any sort. I know most do (S)VCD, and DVD, but not DVD 5. Older Toshiba's have the same limitations, because they came out before home burning of DVD 5 was even invented (sort of).
    Read the owners manual.
    Your cheaper one MAY read +R but not -R, again, read the manual.
    +R is becomming far more compatible (or is it that players are becomming more compatible with +R?)
    I doubt it's a Nero burning problem, so Imgtool won't help at all.
    I also doubt it's the media brand, more likely a +R -R issue, although I could be wrong.
     
  9. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
  10. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Try just selecting the "DVD Video" template in Nero, and don't change any settings.
    Drag and drop the whole VIDEO_TS folder from right to left.
    Burn.
     
  11. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    That was the first thing I tried...when it didn't work, thats when I started doing research and read about all the UDF/ISO suggestions. According to this my Panasonic supports DVD-R:
    http://www.videohelp.com/dvdplayers.php?DVDnameid=241&Search=Search&#comments

    And I know it does, because I can use Nero Express, add a couple xVid avis and burn a DVD-R that plays fine. Right now, it is specifically burning a DVD folder (VIDEO_TS) that is the problem.
     
  12. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Maybe time to ask Nero.
    There may be something about the content of that VIDEO_TS that's messing it all up. Non-standard GOP, or something, could cause it to not play on the standalone.
     
  13. myndphuk

    myndphuk Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    This may sound stupid, but where the TITLE of the compilation says "New", change that to SOME_MOVIE - This MUST be in CAPITAL LETTERS and it MUST NOT have spaces in it.I have had unbelievable problems by not doing this simple thing (won't play in xbox, ps2, a lot of standalone dvd players, but will play in PC).

    Also, use the wizard mode and select 'DVD-Video', and make sure the two ticks on the tickboxes under "ISO" are OFF!
    [] Allow path depth of more than 8 directories
    [] Allow more than 255 characters in path
    [] Do not add the ';1' ISO File version extension.

    All of these MUST NOT be checked.

    If all that fails, and you have copied the files to burn into the "VIDEO_TS" folder, AND you have not deleted the AUDIO_TS folder (always remains empty, but needs to be on compilation for compatability reasons), then I am out of ideas!

    Hope this helps!

    --mynd
     
  14. Mobutu2

    Mobutu2 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Consumer DVD's are not a professional format, and video playback is a very precise issue. To avoid incompatibility issues and to make sure the DVD copy will play back on most home DVD players, the following precautions must be taken:

    1) Use only brand name DVD's (Memorex, Sony, Verbatim). Cheap DVD's or unknown brand names have a higher if not total playback failure rate.

    2) USE DVD-R rather than DVD+R. The former is generally more compatible with most DVD players than the latter.

    3) Use DVD write speeds which match the write speed of your DVD burner. In other words, if your DVD burner burns DVD-R at X8 then use DVD's which run at X8. If your DVD burns DVD-R at X4 then use X4 DVD's.

    4) Prior to burning anything, download your latest BURNER drivers from the website which features your DVD burner label and make. This will avoid incompatibility issues with newer DVD formats.

    5) Be careful when sticking labels on the DVD. Labels increase the playback failure rate. Stick the label on the DVD before you burn the DVD and be very careful in making sure the label is well positioned and flat. Be careful not to damage or scratch the recordable side.

    6) After you have completed the copying procedure, you must verity that the DVD works as planned. Insert it in your home DVD player (which must be compatible with DVD–R) and make sure the menu appears. Then flip through the show in fast forward. If you can fast forward to the end without problem then the DVD is ready for use. If the fast forwarding process stops or if you see static noise at some point while flipping through the show, then the DVD is defective and can be thrown away. Estimated failure rate varies depending on burning equipment used but generally one can estimate 20% of DVD's will be defective due to their non-professional nature.

    Follow these instructions and be aware the compatibility with home players also depends on bit-rate which is an encoding issue. If the bit rate is above 6000 then it could be incompatible with many DVD players. A bit rate above 8000 is incompatible with most DVD players. The general failure rate of DVD's is always around 20% so it is certainly likely this has nothing to do with Nero Express.
     
  15. AzraSound

    AzraSound Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Well, I used Memorex DVD-R with no labels and burnt at 4x even though I think my burner supports up to 16x. I finally convinced myself that it was the players I had....I took one of my "bad" DVDs to the local Fry's electronics store where they have their DVD players plugged in and on display, stuck the DVD in a couple of them and saw that it played. So, in the end, I bought a new DVD player. Movies played fine last night. So, to any who read this, the Panasonic RV31 and the Emerson EWD2004 will have trouble, even with DVD-R, if you're burning a DVD folder (VIDEO_TS) with Nero Burning ROM.
     
  16. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2,631
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    @ Mobutu2
    1, 2, and 3 are mostly false.
    1. Most disk will do just fine, even the cheap 50 pack spindle. It's the PLAYER that's fussy about the media. Cheap players play cheap media with no trouble (usually). Buy a $200 Sony, and it may not play anything.

    2. +R is becoming more standardized than -R. Notice that DL disks are mostly +R, and record at higher speeds as well. Newer standalone recorders actually prefer +R's in most cases.

    3. Providing the disk is rated properly, burn at max. A good burner with good burning software will automatically detect the max write speed of the disk, and burn at that speed. If you have problems with these burns, it's the fussy PLAYER again, not your burning speed nor media.

    4. Drivers are very important. People who assume whatever came on the disk is good enough, are kidding themselves. Especially with some newer burner models, which may not be supported at all, by older driver versions of 3rd party software.

    5.) Very true. Labels look nice, but can totally screw up an otherwise perfect burn. Use a sharpie. It's content, not appearance that makes a good DVD.

    6. I have never verified a burn. Ever. If the software and hardware are working properly, the burn will be a success. Taking that extra time to check it is pointless. Put it in the player and if it works, you know it's successful. Why verify? You can't do anything about it if it's failed, except toss out the coaster and try again. Playing the disk in a standalone is a much more valid test.

    Bitrate above 8000, can cause issues, not 6000. An 8000kbps average can produce spikes that go beyond 9500kbps, and this is where players choke. Set max to 8000, average to 7000, and you'll get a higher quality video, and avoid the spikes.

    Check the bitrate on a commercial DVD, and in some cases, they spike out at 9800 (or more). This works on a pressed disk, not a burn.

    The general failure rate of DVD's is not 20% (I'd love to see where you got that number from). I have a failure rate of about 2%, and that's USER ERROR, not media.
     

Share This Page