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New and have a quick qusetsion

Discussion in 'PS2 - Software boot discussion' started by guyfromfl, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. guyfromfl

    guyfromfl Member

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    Im just now getting into this backup thing. Is there any good description of how the files are packed on the disc and what all this has to do with the boot process. a link is fine so you dont have to type a bunch of crap thats already out there...I tried searching but nothing really came up to answer my ?.

    It doesnt make sense because all the content on the disc is represented as 1 and 0's that are translated by the laser of the drive, so if you have the same series of "bumps" or "flats..." whats the difference...so you'd think..

    thanks!
     
  2. nyder

    nyder Guest


    Yes, it would seem that it should be that easy. After all, it is just basicly 1's & 0's.
    But, there's software (on a chip) that reads the dvd, and if it's not exactly like it's supposed to be, then it won't boot it. that's why there's mod chips, they bascilly take over the systems software and tell it all disks are cool.

    And people have had no problems using DVD copy software to make backups of PS2 games.

    So whats the problem?

    The problem is the PS2's weren't made to read burnt disks. The optical drives in them are expecting to be reading pressed disks all the time. So, some units are more picky then others. Some work great, others don't work hardly at all.
    There is also the burner you are using to burn the dvd's. Maybe it's laser isn't strong enough, maybe the burner can't do bitsetting.

    You might have to just keep testing DVD-+R's until you find that type that works best on your ps2.

     
  3. orthogonl

    orthogonl Regular member

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    The original discs for PlayStation 2 titles have a series of pits and bumps before the data region which cannot be read or written to using a conventional CD/DVD recorder. For this reason, discs which have been copied using conventional means will not have this authentication region present, therefore the disc will fail to authenticate. It's a fairly effective copy protection measure.

    In addition, the PS2 knows when the eject button is pressed. And whenever you use the eject button to load a new disc into the drive, the PS2 scans for a special code. If however, you could change discs without pressing the eject button (ie. swap method/flip-top), the PS2 will simply assume that it still contains a real, store-bought disc, and will happily execute any program on it.

    Likewise, modchips replicate the authentication signal that is normally sent by the PS2's drive hardware when an authorized game disc is present, causing the BIOS to believe that a copied disc is an original and allow you to boot it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2007
  4. guyfromfl

    guyfromfl Member

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    thanks guys that explains alot!

    mark
     

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