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NTSC vs. NTSC(Film)

Discussion in 'MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 encoding (AVI to DVD)' started by skins38, Jun 18, 2002.

  1. skins38

    skins38 Member

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    I'm wondering is anyone has anything to say about NTSC at 29fps vs NTSC(Film) at 23fps.

    My DVD player plays both formats, they seem to be the same quality, and the File sizes are almost exactly the same.

    But NTSC(Film) only takes about 80% of the time to encode. It seems as is NTSC(Film) is the way to go, if your DVD player can handle it of course.
     
  2. dRD

    dRD I hate titles Staff Member

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    True, with an exception of material that was originally shot in 29.97fps and cannot be therefor pulled back to 23.97fps with IVTC (well, it can be, but the results are crappy).
     
  3. skins38

    skins38 Member

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    Ya I forgot to say that, NTSC(Film) is the way to go as long as your source file is 23fps or less.

    Are you sure there's absolutely no difference in quality??
     
  4. dRD

    dRD I hate titles Staff Member

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    We're now speaking of DVD -> VCD conversions. For AVI -> VCD, this doesn't apply and you should never, ever even half-jokingly consider encoding 29.97fps AVI to 23.97fps VCD -- always maintain the accurate fps if possible, otherwise results are crappy.

    But DVD -> VCD is a different thing as movies are normally shot with 23.97fps, but then brought to US TV standard NTSC specs by a process called telecine. So, making an inverse telecine for the video material that we _know_ (virtually all of the big name Hollywood movies) that it has been originally shot as 23.97fps, keeps the quality exactly same as we don't remove anything from the video, just the duped frames that were added there when it was originally transferred from FILM (23.97) to NTSC (29.97).
     

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