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optimizing the hdd to the fullest

Discussion in 'PC hardware help' started by vdojunkie, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. vdojunkie

    vdojunkie Member

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    ive installed a new hdd on my pc 200gigs but m only getting bout 180gigs if that. is there any way to use the full 200gigs.

    thx in advance
     
  2. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    That is the full 200GB. When you format a drive, you lose 7% of the drive's space. The drive does indeed have a 200GB data capacity, but the NTFS file system takes up 7%, or 14GB, leaving you with 186GB.
    Ever wonder why in my computer your drive's maximum size was never a round number?
     
  3. vdojunkie

    vdojunkie Member

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    ok. i see. no i never wondered why. but why is that?
     
  4. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    I've just told you.
    Formatting a drive so you can use it removes 7% of its total storage capacity, so 20GB drives become 18.6GB, 40GB to 37.2, 60GB to 55.8, 80GB to 74.4, 120GB to 111.6, 160GB to 148.6, 200GB to 186GB, 250GB to 232GB, 300GB to 279GB, and so on.
     
  5. vdojunkie

    vdojunkie Member

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    k. thanks for the 411
     
  6. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    I'm guessing that means help or assistance?
     
  7. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    harddrives are sold in salesmans gigs, that is bytes, 200,000.000,000 bytes to a salesman is 200 gigs, alas when you format it and it's more than a few gigs, it tells you it's size in gigs
    you have to devide the 2 billion bytes by 1024 to get the kilobytes then again by 1024 to get the megabytes and..... then again by 1024 to get the gigabytes and thats where the 200 drops to 180 ish it was never really 200 gigs that was only in the salesmans head lol
     
  8. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    So it's 200 Gigabytes, and not Gibibytes?
    A Gibibyte being a binary gigabyte (instead of 1000x1000x1000x1000 bytes, it's 1024x1024x1024x1024 bytes)
    Let's work this out
    1.024^4 = 1.09951.
    200GB / 1.09951 = 181.9GB.
    Are you sure? I always pick up 186GB from my drive.
    As far as I'm aware, the drives are produced as 200GB in the true sense of the word, it's just the NTFS formatting process that changes it.
    I know this because if you format a 160GB drive with NTFS you get 149GB total space. If you format it using FAT32 you only get 147GB. Same drive, different formatting, so I concluded it must be the file systems.
     
  9. vdojunkie

    vdojunkie Member

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    411 =(info). thank you for your help
     
  10. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    ntfs uses a different file system than fat, with ntfs you can actually choose the size of your sectors (no-one ever does), with fat you get one size which depends on the size of the hard drive patition
    you get more space if you have a lot of small partitions than if you have one big one daft but true

    i hope I'm right i did the course passed the exams and thats how i learnt it :)
    but not all 200 gig harddrives are the same size in practice depends on maker, just thats how they sell them. ntfs as a file system uses no actual space apart from what you actually see
     
  11. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Hmm, so where does the 2GB go between them?
     
  12. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    my 200 gig maxtor gives me 189.92 with 13 megs unallocated lol so I've done better than you
    Just put it on to see :)
    that was with a quick format dunno if a long one is different try not to use long ones

    fat uses bigger cluster sizes so you get less space in a sector and therefore less space on a drive
    IE: on a small 5 gig drive the cluster size is 512bytes
    on a 32 gig drive the cluster size is 4096bytes
    so the bigger the drive the less efficient it gets :)
    letts all go back to 5 gig drives :) perhaps not:(
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2007
  13. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    It was quick formatted with 4K cluster size.

    As for the varying size, tell me why every 250GB drive I've seen used (that's Maxtor, WD, Seagate and Samsung) has had 232GB total space, and why every 500GB (that includes all the same brands) has had 465GB. If they vary so much how come every NTFS drive I've had or seen has exactly 7% storage missing? They weren't all mine, so there wasn't a common configuration I was making.
     
  14. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    research it a bit more
    i'm right about the size difference lol
     
  15. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    Care to provide some links? I'm not saying you're wrong, but I'm not entirely sure where to start looking.
     
  16. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    I learnt through courses provided by cisco and comptia,
    got the course books :)
    but you need to be a course member to access the materials
    or a member who has passed one or more courses to get the more advanced stuff

    try the A+ 'testout' discs the closest you can get to the real thing without leaving home
    probably go great with your current courses you could use it as a break
    http://www.dewassoc.com/kbase/hard_drives/hard_drive_size_barriers.htm
    http://www.techiwarehouse.com/cms/articles.php?cat=11 <- this is a good one

     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2007
  17. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    I see now that the cylinder, head and sector count on drives varies giving you that extra bit of breathing room. However, the 7% loss is what most people have experienced. You got lucky with your 5.5%, or chose a generous brand! :)
    The only modern drives I can access without ripping them out of a PC are both WD Caviars, and both omit how many of those they have. A 13GB Seagate Medalist and 4.3GB Samsung probably won't be much cop!
     
  18. pcrepair

    pcrepair Regular member

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    lol Its not a loss it was never there laffff
     
  19. sammorris

    sammorris Senior member

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    well true, let's call it 'difference from marked' then.
     
  20. gtjr_ph

    gtjr_ph Regular member

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    that un allocated space on hdd is where windows put the MBR= master boot record
     

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