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Playing Divx/Xvid movies with AC3 sound

Discussion in 'Audio' started by marom, Oct 6, 2004.

  1. marom

    marom Member

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    I want to connect my computer to my home entertainment system.
    Before buying a new sound card I wanted to make sure my computer plays the soudn at all, I have a movie that is encoded (according to Virtualdub) with AC3 (5 channels). When playing the movie with Bsplayer and opening the properties of the "AC3 Filter" I don't see any indication that AC3 sound is being played.
    I have K-Lite codec pack installed on my computer (That's how I got the AC3 codec).
    Do I have to have the sound card for it to be played?

    Thank you for the help
     
  2. daemonzx6

    daemonzx6 Regular member

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    I don't think the soudn card has anything to do with it. Try installing the newest AC3 Filter, 1.01a RC5, and see how it works. I had a movie with AC3 that played fine but then I installed a codec pack and then AC3 didn't work anymore, so I installed it again separately and then it worked again.
     
  3. marom

    marom Member

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    That didn't work.
    In the mean time I installed a new sound card (Just so I will have s/pdif output) and now I have another question.
    I understood that I need a coaxial cable to connect my receiver to my sound card. On the receiver end I need an RCA jack, I'm not sure which jack I should use on the sound card's end. I know it looks like the jack used for regular computer speakers or for the microphone (3.5mm?) but do I need a stereo one or the mono one?
    Can anyone tell me how I can make this cable???
    Thanks
     
  4. daemonzx6

    daemonzx6 Regular member

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    if you are asknig how to connect the audio out from your computer to your tv, then I can help. if i understand correctly, you need the speaker end at the computer to change to RCA for the tv end. i have done this before and i had to buy a little adapter from radio shack for about five dollars. it plugged right in to the audio out and gave me stereo RCA out. then i got the red and white RCA cables and connected them on both the computer and the tv to produce sound through my entertainment system. although, i think there is a cable that you can buy, i think it might not be long enough.
     
  5. marom

    marom Member

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    Again, thanks for the reply.
    What are these red and white RCA cables? I can't really understand what the cable should be like...
    Please elaborate more if you can.
    Thanks








     
  6. marom

    marom Member

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    Also, I want to hear 5.1 surround sound, is that what you are doing?
     
  7. The_OGS

    The_OGS Active member

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    Actually, you are connecting your sound card to your receiver. (We require precise terminology here :)
    There are 2 types of SPDIF: Optical and Coaxial (RCA).
    It looks like a regular A/V RCA but it is not, it's SPDIF.
    Did you not just say you have a new sound card, with coaxial SPDIF out?
    SPDIF is not 'mono' or 'stereo' - there is one, digital, coaxial stream, using RCA-type plug (or fibre-optical, which I use).
    So you must have SPDIF output, on either your motherboard or soundboard, and a corresponding SPDIF input on your receiver.
    A 3.5mm stereo phono plug is an analog output.
    It is not SPDIF.
    Marom, buddy, the white one is Left channel and the red one is Right channel (it's called stereo).
    I find it hard to believe that, on the one hand you needed a new soundboard with SPDIF output, but on the other hand you do not even know how to hookup L & R analog audio to your receiver...
    There you go :)
    Well, it is to his receiver actually, but the principle is the same...
    So, now that your audio is hooked up, if you want to get SPDIF going, well I guess that is a separate issue for you.
    Are you all set now?
    L8R
     
  8. marom

    marom Member

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    Maybe I didn't express myself correctly, so here's where I stand.

    The receiver deffinetly needs an RCA jack, my problem was which should I use on the sound card's end. I found a quote in Creative's forums saying that I need a regular mono 3.5mm jack, at least that's what I understand. I think the problem is solved, am I right?

     
  9. The_OGS

    The_OGS Active member

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    The receiver definitely needs two RCA jacks (L & R).
    The equivalent soundcard output is 3.5mm stereo plug (what has been called a 'walkman' plug, because it supports that type of small headphones).
    Like daemonzx6 says, you can get a 3.5mm stereo (male) to L & R RCA (female) adapter.
    I buy 3.5mm stereo (male) to L & R RCA (male) patchcords, 2 metres in length, from Radio Shack or whatever. It is difficult to find them longer, if you require, so you could get the adapter instead, and use your own 5 metre RCA cables.
    When you say '1 RCA input on receiver' we assume you are talking about a coaxial SPDIF input.
    So, what was all this talk about SPDIF, anyway?
     
  10. Neuro42

    Neuro42 Guest

    I think he may be implying that his television only supports mono input.

    I which case the the RCA plug would be white (or yellow and white for video and audio)

    While the simple y-Adapter is all black (and the 6" Y-Cable I used was... they have a 3' version with the red and white audio ends
    [​IMG]

    cost $5.99US and has a male radio jack to 2 male RCA jacks.

    this [​IMG]

    is a stereo patch cable (OR Stereo RCA cable) and costs $6.99US
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 14, 2004
  11. marom

    marom Member

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    I AM talking about S/PDIF!!
    That's the whole idea, transferring a DIGITAL signal from the sound card to the receiver...
    Anyways, I already have the cable (It's 14 meters long) today I'm gonna connect the mono 1/8" jack (Minijack...) and we'll see if it works.
     
  12. marom

    marom Member

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    OK, problem solved. Here's my configuration:
    Sound Blaster Live 5.1, connected to a 5.1 able receiver with a coax cable 1/8" minijack on one end and a RCA jack on the other.
    On my computer I'm using AC3Filter 1.01 codec.
    For the surround to work I unchecked the option (from the SB Live program) "AC3 decode", meaning the sound card won't decode the sound. I did the same thing with the AC3 codec, and also I checked "SPDif".
    That way, the sound blaster will transfer clean AC3 coded sound and so will the codec. The codec also knows that I'm using SPDif and that way I don't need to define the speakers configuration, instead the receiver identifies it automatically according to the encoded sound from the movie.

    Thank you very much for all the help, through my mis-frasing I learned what I really needed :)

    Guy Marom
     

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