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Real DVDShrink 3.1.7 minimum requirements??

Discussion in 'DVD Shrink forum' started by oquela, May 31, 2004.

  1. oquela

    oquela Member

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    I use DVDShrink 3.1.7 on a WinXP Pro system with
    1gig of RAM, and a decent processor. It is flawless.

    I recently recommended this program to a newbie
    who has a Win 98SE box with 128 MB of ram and a
    800 mhz processor. She has had mixed results.
    Aside from ASPI issues, and other IDE related
    problems, does she [bold]definitely[/bold] need:
    a)more RAM
    B)Windows XP
    C) faster processor
    D)All of the above
    or
    E) this is an ok setup, just needs to be "tweaked"

    I think its just a RAM problem, but some people think
    it's more of an OS problem.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2004
  2. flip218

    flip218 Moderator Staff Member

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    More RAM will never hurt... Now the only problem you'll run into using DVD Shrink on Windows 98se, is you cannot create "ISO Image Files". ISO files are over 4GB's and 98 uses a FAT32 file system which is limited to files under 4GB.So heres some options:
    1) When using Shrink, create video_ts files and use Nero to burn.
    2) Convert your HD from FAT32 to NTFS. You can use partition magic 8.0 http://www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic/
    You can use this and not lose all your files.
    3) Upgrade to XP :)
     
  3. flip218

    flip218 Moderator Staff Member

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    oh, I use shrink on both computers.
     
  4. oquela

    oquela Member

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    thanks flip218,
    I don't think that she'll be doing ISO image files anytime soon. video_ts files/nero will probably be what she'll most often do. I suggested 256/512 RAM minimum, (if her motherboard will take it) since it's hit and miss with her current RAM.

    Thanks again.
     
  5. brobear

    brobear Guest

    Its always a good idea to upgrade the RAM, the factory almost always, puts in the minimum unless the customer orders extra. I opted for 1 G on mine. The old boards will usually hold up to 512 MB. Its the cheapest way to make a computer run better on the upgrade line.

    I agree with flip218 on the FAT32 problem. If you're going to burn dvds you need to change to NTFS.
     
  6. sly_61019

    sly_61019 Senior member

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    i run fat32 and have no problems burning dvds. You can easily create iso images over 4gb with dvd decrypter, it just creates 2 images and a .mds file to link them.
     
  7. brobear

    brobear Guest

    oquela,
    D would be the best solution. With the XP you can easily switch to the NTFS file system. The RAM is the next cheapest upgrade. One thing you will get into, XP will run slower on the PC than the 98. Upgrading the CPU would be a good idea. Without a faster CPU, the computer is at the threshold of being able to burn dvd. At some point you have wonder about the cost compared to a new unit.
     
  8. chthomson

    chthomson Regular member

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    Hi oquela
    I run my kids machine on Win 98SE with 384 megs of ram. When I ran 512 I had some problems as Win 98 has difficulties with ram over 512. I converted a sister machine with 768 mb of ram to XP and all the memory/speed issues of 98 cleared up. If it was my machine I would upgrade to XP with 512 MB ram and format the drive to NTFS
    I hope this helps
     
  9. brobear

    brobear Guest

    I had a gateway for many years with a PII at 350 MHz. It was ordered with 128 MB RAM. OS Windows 98.
    Upgraded to 98SE as came available. It started slowing down as programs began to advance. The old board would accept 512K RAM. Gave it the full amount and it gave the computer a new lease on life. There are also BIOS upgrades from the manufacturer that help the firmware in some cases. The old gateway could run a CD burner. I kept it until the new DVD burner technology came out. I gave it to my son and its still going strong. Just won't burn DVD. It's slow but sure. The lesson I learned was the importance of RAM.

    On the new systems that can handle it 1G is good. Over that and you're looking at waste.

    chtomson is right, don't go over the limit of the board, the rest of the system is only geared for that max amount. If you don't have the specs for your unit, you can check with the manufacturer; i.e. the website or tech assistance.
     
  10. flip218

    flip218 Moderator Staff Member

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    I read a post in a different thread, it has to do with switching from FAT32 to NTFS. If you switch to NTFS, you'll need an O/S that supports NTFS (ie.XP or 2000). So Oquela your friend will need to upgrade her O/S if she wants to switch to NTFS.
     
  11. oquela

    oquela Member

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    Many thanks for all your recommendations. I'm going to suggest to her that she start with RAM, since it's the least expensive, then if needed move up to XP Pro/home.
    She was going to get a whole new computer, but she only uses Office, and uses the internet. At least now, she'll be able to burn DVDs without a whole new machine.

    Thanks again to flip218, brobear, sly_61019, and chthomson.
     

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