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Recording from DVD to DVD

Discussion in 'DVD recorders' started by AngryWite, Nov 28, 2004.

  1. AngryWite

    AngryWite Member

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    I've been doing some research and have found that you can bypass the copywrite signal block by using a DVD signal stabilizer. Does anyone have any experience using this equipment? If so, can you please tell me which one and where you got it?
     
  2. catfreak

    catfreak Active member

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     ... Why don't you use your computer to duplicate your DVDs ... DVD Decrypter is an effective CSS remover and you can use both DVD Shrink and DVD Decrypter if the disc is a DL ...
     
  3. saugmon

    saugmon Senior member

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    Hey angrywite, not sure about a signal block. I use dvd shrink and nero on pc using rw's.The copywrite is gone. Then i will take two of my backups put it on the standalone player and record onto my standalone burner.I lose a bit of quality but when you got 3 different sets of grandkids, i reburn them on R's.I can then erase the rw's till i get a couple new kid movies.1 movie only from rw to r would be a lot better quality. I haven't used dual layer like catfreak said,but it works on standard 4.7 dvd's.Later
     
  4. AngryWite

    AngryWite Member

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    Do you need a DVD burner to burn DVDs on the computer or can I just use my CD burner? Also, I want to use the DVD recorder so I can record movies off my pay per view satellite channels and record rentals while I'm watching them. So, do you guys have any info on signal stabilizers?
     
  5. catfreak

    catfreak Active member

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  6. DogBomb

    DogBomb Regular member

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    There are (or at least were) a few DVD players that could bypass it too, but I forgot which ones. But why bother since you'll lose all the menu features?

    Playstation 2 Lets Users Bypass DVD Copy-Protection Scheme
    By Barry Willis


    March 26, 2000 — The cat has really gotten out of the bag with Sony's new Playstation 2. In mid-March, we reported that the machine can play Digital Versatile Discs from all regions, reinforcing one of the film industry's biggest fears: that the new format will circumvent carefully orchestrated release dates. Now it appears that the machine can do more.

    At about the same time the region-code glitch was discovered, Japanese users began reporting that they could use the Playstation's analog RGB output to make videotape copies of DVD movies, thereby defeating the Macrovision encoding that prevents consumers from making clean dubs from DVDs. Much sleep will no doubt be lost in Hollywood over this latest revelation—the proliferation of clean, free copies is one of the entertainment industry's most persistent nightmares.

    The news has been an embarrassment to Sony, according to Yoshiko Hara of the Electronic Engineering Times, which reported the "flaw" on March 24. The problem could prompt the development of new and more rigorous copy-protection technology, Hara speculates, mentioning that there is some question as to whether Sony's computer entertainment division has violated a DVD industry agreement by including the analog RGB interface on the Playstation 2. Some observers point out that the Playstation 2 may not be a standalone DVD player, but a personal computer. Computers are allowed RGB outputs, according to industry rules, but DVD players are not.

    It is unclear whether Hollywood will attempt to take action against Sony over the issue. Sony spokesmen say the company did nothing wrong in designing the Playstation 2.


     
  7. AngryWite

    AngryWite Member

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    DogBomb,
    How do I know if my DVD player can bypass the signal? Does it do it automatically or do you have to change an option on the player? I've allready tried to record off a DVD and it didn't work. Also, what do you mean I'll lose the options? The DVD options? I don't mind that, as long as I can record the movie. Finally, have you tried to record off a DVD using the playstation? What do I have to do in order to bypass the signal?
     
  8. DogBomb

    DogBomb Regular member

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    In answer to all your questions...I don't know. ;) If you mean punching in a code in the VCR like you can to make it region-free, I doubt it. I just read about some specific no-name brands that would allow the DVDs to be recorded by hooking up a few cables. About the options, I mean the menu options or any of the conveniences that you have with the original (easter eggs, etc.) It would be like recording a VHS or family video from a camcorder - you would have to make your own chapters, etc. And I'm sure you'd lose some quality (probably not noticeable) because you are recording from a signal rather than transferring actual data bytes from a DVD. Also, you'd probably have to use a preset time setting like 1 hr or 2 hr, meaning a movie that is only 70 minutes is going to leave lots of extra space on your DVD. If you have a computer, why not just get a $50 burner and use DVD Shrink? It's not like capturing camcorder video on PC where you'd need a ton of extra equipment like capture cards, etc.
     

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