1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

"Recording Prohibited" from Old VHS tape ?!

Discussion in 'DVD recorders' started by ntblood, Jan 18, 2007.

  1. ntblood

    ntblood Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hi. I have a Sony external DVD burner for my camcorder but I thought it would be great to covert my Star Wars and Empire Strikes Back old VHS tapes to DVD particularly because Star Wars in it's original form is not available on DVD (I do own the new version collection sets on VHS and DVD). I just like to see Han Solo blow away Gredo without Gredo taking a sloppy first shot and Jabba in the added scene looks stupid in "A New Hope". Well, luckily Star Wars converted over fine but the Empire Strikes Back gave me a "Recording Prohibited" as I ruined 2-3 blank DVDs. Well, I haven't seen anyone post a work around for this but I have found several people who've experienced this issue.
    If you know of a fix that would be wonderful.
    Please let me know. I though we bought these external DVD burners to 1. easily get our miniDV tapes onto DVD and 2. convert our old VHS tapes to DVD. What is the story with that? Some archaic copywrite protection that we can't work around which they had the forsight to create in such a way as to be picked up on technology 25 years into the future. B.S. and that's putting it more mildly then was my original intent.
    Thank you for your time.
     
  2. LCSHG

    LCSHG Regular member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    589
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    You are most likely running into a Copy Protection called Macro Vision [MV] In the dubbing of VHS tape to DVD you will most likely have this problem. There is not a fix for your unit in itself.
    It would seem, by your post that you are using a PC If so you can go through that process. If a standalone recorder What Unit is it
    There are forums and guides on this site that explain the PC process, the equipment and software to use
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2007
  3. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    I just posted something about this in another thread: You need a Time-Base Corrector or, at least, a clarifier/stabilizer. TBCs correct timing problems with tapes; clarifiers are designed more to make minor fixes to timing problems, but both remove copy-protection as a byproduct of their operation. A good TBC is $200-$300 but does good work, but there was a thread around here in the last month or so in which several people claimed to get good results from $30 stabilizers. I don't remember the model numbers give, so do a search. You really need one of these anyway to correct a lot of the jitter coming off of VHS.

    An alternative is to use a software-based capture card i.e. no hardware MPEG-2 encoder. I have one of these and, frankly, the results are marginal at best, but it's the cheapest route to go.
     
  4. ntblood

    ntblood Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Hi. Thank you for taking time to reply. That is very helpful. Quickly to follow up, is the "no hardware MPEG-2 encoder" cheaper than the $30 stabalizer? It's an encoder and not a decoder, right? This is a physical card that I'd need?
     
  5. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Actually they're about the same; I have one of those non-encoding cards, a K-world 688 I think, and I paid about $27 for it. I think the stabilizer/clarifier is much better anyway, but you'd have to search past threads to find the good models.
     
  6. LCSHG

    LCSHG Regular member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Messages:
    589
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    If you are using a stand alone recorder a $30 stabilizer may be OK, however I do not put much faith in them
    A top TBC as Dunker mentioned is expensive but would most likely do the job
    Do not expect any TBC to correct the newer forms of CP encountered with DVD or satellite/broadcast reception – They Will Not

    If you plan on using a PC.. There are forms and guides on this site that can direct you
    If so I doubt you will need a TBC
    By your past posts and if using a PC I do not think you would be satisfied with the results
    Unless you get the proper hardware and software

    Dunker quote
    "An alternative is to use a software-based capture card i.e. no hardware MPEG-2 encoder. I have one of these and, frankly, the results are marginal at best, but it's the cheapest route to go."


    Thats honest and to the point

    For VHS to DVD, If you have access to a stand-alone unit I would Use it and try the stabilizer
     
  7. donewell

    donewell Regular member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Messages:
    437
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    26
    I have a ads tech dvd express for copying vhs tapes. your vcr audio outs and video out go to the dvd express then dvd express is hooked to pc usb plug. no problems copying copy protected vhs tapes. They don't know they are being copied they think you are just playing them.
     
  8. DrAVeN__

    DrAVeN__ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    I bought a stand alone dvd+r vcr combo and was curious if just hooking up a cheap vcr to the inputs would solve the issue or would the dvd recorder still pick up on it?
     
  9. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,444
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    No, it would not work. Using a TBC/stabilizer or a non-hardware capture ard is your only alternative.
     

Share This Page