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recovering a lost document

Discussion in 'Windows - General discussion' started by orngcrsh, May 2, 2007.

  1. orngcrsh

    orngcrsh Regular member

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    I was working on a document using Word and when I went to save it, it gave me some error messages and didn't save the file. It deleted the file altogether. Is there any way to recover this file? I've seen in word that there is a lost document recovery tool, but am unable to find it..

    any help is GREATLY appreciated!!

    thanks
    joseph
     
  2. borhan9

    borhan9 Active member

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    I went to the help in MS worrd (I have 2007, it may be a little different) I found the following:


    Automatically save and recover Office files
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    Sometimes a Microsoft Office program closes before you can save changes to a file you are working on. Some possible causes include:

    A power outage occurs.
    Your system is made unstable by another program.
    Something goes wrong with the Microsoft Office program itself.
    Although you can't always prevent problems such as these from happening, you can take steps to protect your work when an Office program closes abnormally.

    What do you want to do?

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Learn how AutoRecover and AutoSave work
    Enable and adjust AutoRecover and AutoSave
    Save early and save often

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    Learn how AutoRecover and AutoSave work
    The AutoRecover option (in these Microsoft Office programs: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher, and Visio) and AutoSave option (in Microsoft Office Outlook) can help you avoid losing work in two ways:

    Your data is automatically saved If you enable AutoRecover or AutoSave, your file (such as a Microsoft Office Word document) or item (such as an Outlook e-mail message) is automatically saved as often as you want. Therefore, if you have been working for a long time but forget to save a file or if your power goes out, the file you have been working on contains all or at least some of the work you have done since you last saved it.
    Your program state is automatically saved In Microsoft Office Excel, Microsoft Office Outlook, Microsoft Office PowerPoint, and Microsoft Office Word, there is an additional benefit to enabling AutoRecover or AutoSave. In these programs, if you enable this option, some aspects of the state of the program are recovered when the program is restarted after it closed abnormally.

    For example, you are working on several Excel workbooks at the same time. Each file is open in a different window, with specific data visible in each window. In one of the workbooks, a cell is selected to help you keep track of which rows you already reviewed, and then Excel crashes. When you restart Excel, it opens the workbooks again and restores the windows to the way they were before Excel crashed.

    Although not every aspect of your program's state can be recovered, in many cases, the Recovery feature can help you recover more quickly.
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    Enable and adjust AutoRecover and AutoSave
    To enable these features, do the following in one of these Microsoft Office programs:

    Excel, PowerPoint, or Word

    Click the Microsoft Office Button, and then click Excel Options, PowerPoint Options, or Word Options.
    Click Save.
    Select the Save AutoRecover information every x minutes check box.
    In the minutes list, specify how often you want the program to save your data and the program state.
    Tip The amount of new information that the recovered file contains depends on how frequently a Microsoft Office program saves the recovery file. For example, if the recovery file is saved only every 15 minutes, your recovered file won't contain your last 14 minutes of work before the power failure or other problem occurred.

    Optionally, in Microsoft Office Word or Microsoft Office Excel, you can change the location (specified in the AutoRecover file location box) where the program automatically saves a version of files you work on.
    Outlook

    On the Tools menu, click Options.
    On the Preferences tab, click E-mail Options, and then click Advanced E-mail Options.
    Select the AutoSave items every: x minutes check box.
    In the minutes list, specify how often you want the program to save your data and the program state.
    Tip The amount of new information that the recovered item contains depends on how frequently a Microsoft Office program saves the recovery item. For example, if the recovery item is saved only every 15 minutes, your recovered item won't contain your last 14 minutes of work before the power failure or other problem occurred.

    Optionally, on the AutoSave items in menu, select the folder where you want Outlook to automatically save items.
    Visio

    On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Save/Open tab.
    Select the Save AutoRecover information every x minutes check box.
    In the minutes list, specify how often you want the program to save your data.
    Tip The amount of new information that the recovered file contains depends on how frequently a Microsoft Office program saves the recovery file. For example, if the recovery file is saved only every 15 minutes, your recovered file won't contain your last 14 minutes of work before the power failure or other problem occurred.
    Publisher

    On the Tools menu, click Options, and then click the Save tab.
    Select the Save AutoRecover information every x minutes check box.
    In the minutes list, specify how often you want the program to save your data.
    Tip The amount of new information that the recovered file contains depends on how frequently a Microsoft Office program saves the recovery file. For example, if the recovery file is saved only every 15 minutes, your recovered file won't contain your last 14 minutes of work before the power failure or other problem occurred.
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    Save early and save often
    The AutoRecover and AutoSave features are not a substitute for regularly saving your work by clicking Save . Manually saving your file is the surest way to preserve the work you have done.

    Keyboard shortcut To save a file, press CTRL+S.

    Or you can try this.

    Use the Document Recovery task pane to recover your files
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    Sometimes a Microsoft Office program closes unexpectedly before you can save changes to a file you are working on. When this happens, the Document Recovery feature recovers as much as possible of the work that you did since you last saved the file.

    When you start a Microsoft Office program after it closes abnormally, one of two things occurs:

    If data is available to the program about the latest changes you made to the file, the program opens the file so you can continue your work.
    What determines whether the Document Recovery task pane is displayed?

    Depending on how and why the program closed abnormally, data about the changes you made before the event occurred may be available to the program. If this data is available and the program can determine that it has recovered all the changes you made, it shows you that version of your file. If you are not sure this version is the version that you want, click the Recovered button (on the status bar) to open the Document Recovery task pane and decide which version you want to keep.
    If you need to identify which version of a file you want to keep, the program displays the Document Recovery task pane automatically.
    Use the Document Recovery task pane
    The Document Recovery task pane displays up to three versions of your file. In general, the file versions are displayed with the most current version at the top of the list.

    Tip If the Document Recovery task pane makes it harder to see your file, you can click Recovered on the status bar to close the task pane. Click Recovered again to open the task pane.

    Review the available versions of your file.
    A recovered version of your file

    This version should be the most current version of your file. (It is displayed only after a crash in which some or all changes that you made to a file were recovered.) Click this version, and then review the file.

    This version looks correct

    If the file looks correct, right-click this choice, and then click Save As to save the file. Your file is now recovered. You can stop reading this procedure.
    This version does not look correct

    Proceed to the next step.
    The word Repaired appears in this version

    If you want to see what repairs were made, right-click the file version, and then click Show Repairs.

    An automatically saved version (AutoSaved) of your file

    Click this version, and then review the file.
    This version looks correct

    If the file looks correct, right-click this choice, and then click Save As to save the file. Your file is now recovered. You can stop reading this procedure.
    This version does not look correct

    Proceed to the next step.
    The word Repaired appears in this version

    If you want to see what repairs were made, right-click the file version, and then click Show Repairs.

    The original version of your file

    After you click this version, you should review the file.
    This version looks correct

    If the file looks correct, right-click this choice, and then click Save As to save the file. Your file is now recovered. You can stop reading this procedure.
    This version does not look correct

    If, after reviewing all available versions of your file, you still don't see a version that has the correct and latest content, you may have lost some of your work. Right-click the version that looks the most correct, and then click Save As to keep that version.
    Note To decrease the chances of losing work again, see Avoid losing work when an Office program closes abnormally.

    The word Repaired appears in this version

    If you want to see what repairs were made, right-click the file version, and then click Show Repairs.

    You might not be sure which version is the right version, or you might not have time to figure it out right now. In these situations, you can save each version with a different name and then go back later to review the different versions. Right-click each version in the Document Recovery task pane, and then click Save As.
    When you have opened and saved all of the files that you want to keep, click Close in the Document Recovery task pane.
    To decrease the chances of losing work while you use your Microsoft Office program, see Avoid losing work when an Office program closes abnormally.

    I hope all that information helps you out.
     

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