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Ritek purple disk skipping

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by bridgey, May 3, 2004.

  1. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Hi again,

    ok so after being told that the orange Ritek's were overprints, i tried the genuine article the purple Ritek with Ritek on the label,however im still having skipping problems about 30 mins into some disks. The only media i have found to be perfect is Verbatim RW-, however these retail for $4.99 aust.am i forever bound to these? nothing else works 100%. not even Ritek the holy grail of dvd media, id appreciate any thoughs or suggestions......for the record i use shrink and liteon burner.

    Thanks

    Bridgey

     
  2. brian100

    brian100 Guest

    Have you checked your Ritek burnt media for "read errors". If not try DVDinfopro. You can get it here :-

    http://www.dvdinfopro.com/

    have you tried th offending disks on a friends machine yet?. It aint always the media, it can also be the hardware youre playing them on.
     
  3. Palmyra

    Palmyra Member

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    Have not read your other thread so This may have bees suggested before.

    When you read the original do it in deep scan mode. When you write do it at a lesser speed than the max of your burner. In shrink do a custom compression on any extras that you may want to keep. Compress down to the lowest number it will allow. Get rid of any audio that you do not want. BTW I do keep 5:1 for the future. “Speed and Size Kills”

    Does the skip take place on both a set top unit and during playback on the burner? Does your system also have a DVD-ROM? If so dose it skip. Firmware and ASPI up to date?

    http://www.adaptec.com/worldwide/su...cat=/Product/ASPI-4.70&filekey=aspi_471a2.exe

    Follow the instructions carefully, and make sure to reboot afterwards.

    Good luck…
     
  4. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Thanks all,
    Brian 100 i used dvd infopro and was able to detect errors, makes it a lot easier than having to watch dvd only to discover its no good!
    if you compress movie down to the minimum what happens, does quality suffer?

    thanks
    Bridgey
     
  5. herbsman

    herbsman Moderator Staff Member

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    The user [bold]grogey[/bold] has a lite-on burner (if I remember correctly) and she quite kindly did some tests on all sorts of media : http://forums.afterdawn.com/thread_view.cfm/83117

    (Hope this helps you as the Ritek branded are top blank discs to use).
     
  6. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Thanks Herbsman i will check that out

    Bridgey
     
  7. brian100

    brian100 Guest

    bridgey

    Yessum Boss...symptoms of heavy compression can include pixellation, grain, mosquito effect, lack of colour depth.

    For DVD9 that need "excessive" compression I use DVDrebuilder with CCEbasic. It really is the business, but you are going to have to spend some money on CCEbasic (approx $53,£32) You can read a guide here :-

    http://www.afterdawn.com/guides/archive/dvd_rebuilder_tutorial.cfm
     
  8. vurbal

    vurbal Administrator Staff Member

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    I agree with Brian100. If you're going to compress, use DVD-Rebuilder. IMO you can't touch CCE Basic's quality with any program that doesn't re-encode (like DVD Shrink). Read through the guide Brian posted and you can see how easy it is. IMO the $58 for CCE is a bargain. If you have multiple computers to use, it's even possible to encode on all of them at the same time.
     
  9. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Thanks to all who replied,
    Just as a rough giude when using the compression on shrink, what is approximate compression percentage that will allow good quality, without butchering dvd?
    50-60-70 ?
    I did Sea Of Love recently and used maximum compression on movie, quality was ok, but i did notice the quality slightly different but not enough to say i would re do movie.

    Thanks again to all

    Bridgey
     
  10. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    In my opinion, less than 80% is very noticeable, but have got a 60" and 80" screen....
     
  11. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Thanks oriphus i will see what 80% looks like
     
  12. brian100

    brian100 Guest

    In my personal experince it's not always the % level that dicates overall image results. The length of the movie greatly dicates the quality. A 3 hour movie at 85% will often look far worse than an 1 1/2 hour long movie at %60. Although there are exceptions to this rule, and thats where the dreaded "grey area" takes over!!. I backed up my "Red dragon" & "Bowling for columbine" movies, both exhibited a massive %60 - %70 compression level, but the finished results were outstanding, even on my 44" projection telly.

    Bottom line, it's best to experiment yourself, and use the specific tool that you feel will suit the need in hand.

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2004
  13. bridgey

    bridgey Member

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    Thanks Brian 100,

    Yes i believe the way to tackle backing up dvd's is experimentation, both with the type of media, and compression.
    You might be ablr to help with another issue? When i use Decrypter for movies under 4.3 gig, i still go into the red on Nero?, this even happens for less than 4 gig movies, any ideas?

    Thanks

    Bridgey
     
  14. brian100

    brian100 Guest

    For starters, I do not use nero for burning my DVD's I have used copytodvd for a long time. It has never let me down so i think..hey..why change? For Nero help..stand by, someone will spring to your help.

    For movies under 4.3gb (ie DVD5) I simply use Decrypter to rip & then burn. IE mode "ISO read" (to rip) then "ISO write" (to burn)


    _X_X_X_X_X_[small]2 cardboard boxes
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    16 Pieces Of Absent Minded Memory.
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    Nvidia Crapmax 12 (8 Colour!!) Graphics Card
    36" Long Fish Tank (Including guppies) For Viewing.[/small]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2004
  15. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    what size does it stop going into the read at. Also what version of Nero and you using?
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2004
  16. Oriphus

    Oriphus Senior member

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    Also, when i state that anything below 80% is what i deem as noticeable, i am comparing to the original only. Therefore, it doesnt really matter that different discs are compressed different ways and have varying bit rates, it simply, for me, a case of comparison over the original. Since the constant compression of shrink will perform as stated (constant compression), then 80% is verging on a very noticeable difference...
     

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