1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Samsung Flat TV - any good?

Discussion in 'HDTV discussion' started by chemisics, Mar 10, 2007.

  1. chemisics

    chemisics Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2007
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
  2. Rob423

    Rob423 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Samsungs are good, my uncle has one great LCD.

    HDMI and DVI are cables that will allow you to produce your HD content video.


    PS3 uses an HDMI cable... so just make sure your LCD or whatever TV you buy supports HDMI and it would be nice if your TV supports 1080p which is the highest resolution. This would allow you to view BluRay movies with the ps3 at awesome quality.

    Hope that helps.

    There's tons of helpful information on this site, just Do some searching around and catch up on some things..


    Rob.
     
  3. BigDK

    BigDK Regular member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,637
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46

    High-definition television (HDTV) offers a much better picture quality than standard television. HD's greater clarity means the picture on screen is less blurred and less fuzzy. HD also brings other benefits - smoother motion, richer and more natural colors, surround sound and the chance for different equipment to work better together.

    Almost all commercially-available HD is digital, so the system cannot produce a snowy or washed out image from a weak signal, effects from signal interference, such as herringbone patterns, or vertical rolling. HD digital signals will either deliver an excellent picture, a picture with noticeable pixelation, a series of still pictures, or no picture at all. Any interference will render the signal unwatchable. As opposed to a lower-quality signal one gets from interference in an analogue television broadcast, interference in a digital television broadcast will freeze, skip, or display "garbage" information.

    With HDTV the lack of imperfections in the television screen often seen on traditional television is another reason why many prefer high definition to analog. As mentioned, problems such as snow caused from a weak signal, double images from ghosting or multi-path and picture sparkles from impulse noise are a thing of the past. These problems often seen on a conventional television broadcast just do not occur on HDTV.

    HD programming and films will be presented in 16:9 widescreen format (although films created in even wider ratios will still display "letterbox" bars on the top and bottom of even 16:9 sets.) Older films and programming that retain their 4:3 ratio display will be presented in a version of letterbox commonly called "pillar box", displaying bars on the right and left of 16:9 sets (rendering the term "fullscreen" a misnomer). While this is an advantage when it comes to playing 16:9 movies, it creates the same disadvantage when playing 4:3 television shows that standard televisions have playing 16:9 movies. A way to address this is to zoom the 4:3 image to fill the screen or reframe its material to 14:9 aspect ratio, either during preproduction or manually in the TV set.

    The colors will generally look more realistic, due to their greater bandwidth. The visual information is about 2-5 times more detailed overall. The gaps between scanning lines are smaller or invisible. Legacy TV content that was shot and preserved on 35 mm film can now be viewed at nearly the same resolution as that at which it was originally photographed. A good analogy for television quality is looking through a window. HDTV offers a degree of clarity that is much closer to this.

    Two new pre-recorded disc formats support HDTV resolutions, namely HD DVD (High Definition Digital Versatile Disc, supporting 720p, 1080i and 1080p) and BD (Blu-ray Disc, supporting up to 1080p). Most players for both systems are backward-compatible with DVDs. While the two formats are not currently compatible with each other, some companies, such as LG Electronics, sell combo drives which support both HD DVD and BD.

    The "i" in these numbers stands for "interlaced" while the "p" stands for "progressive". With interlaced scan, the 1,080 lines are split into two, the first 540 being "painted" on a frame, followed by the second 540 painted on another frame. This method reduces the bandwidth and raises the frame rate to 50-60 per second. A progressive scan displays all 1,080 lines at the same time at 60 frames per second, using more bandwidth. (See: An explanation of HDTV numbers and laymens glossary)

    Dolby Digital 5.1 surround sound is broadcast along with standard HDTV video signals, allowing full surround sound capabilities. (Standard broadcast television signals usually only include monophonic or stereophonic audio. Stereo broadcasts can be encoded with Dolby Surround, an early home video surround format.) Both designs make more efficient use of electricity than SDTV designs of equivalent size, which can mean lower operating costs. LCD is a leader in energy conservation.
     
  4. imike24

    imike24 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11

Share This Page