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Show an 8 hour video in 2 minutes

Discussion in 'Other video questions' started by gmoyer, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. gmoyer

    gmoyer Member

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    We want to condense an 8 hour video to playback into a 2-3 minute video to show a machine creating a rapid prototype model. This video will then be part of a webpage. What software/hardware can I use to do this? I did a search and couldn't find anything. Maybe my search terms were wrong, but I would appreciate any help.

    Thank you,
    Grant
     
  2. TPFKAS

    TPFKAS Regular member

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    In most intermediate or advanced video editing programs you can speed up your movie. Adobe's Premiere and Premiere Elements can do it (a free 30 day trial available at their website).
    Maybe there is also a VirtualDUB filter for it?

    http://www.digitalvideoclub.com
     
  3. rebootjim

    rebootjim Active member

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    If it's currently at 29.97fps, then it has roughly 864000 frames for 8 hours. To play that back in 2 minutes, you need 7200fps.

    Good luck ;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2005
  4. pfh

    pfh Guest

    Yeah really, good luck.
    I'd have to think you'd be looking at putting it thru a professional editing setup due to the fact that a WHOLE BUNCH of it would need cut out to reduce frames. Therefore reducing Reboots 7200fps number.
    Then you'd have to deal with any audio to sync with it. Your basically doing a time lapse thing by simulating time lapse photography- might be best left up to pro's.
    Then after you have suitable footage convert it to a format suitable for internet bandwidth. Divx or xvid come to mind here.
     
  5. shiroh

    shiroh Guest

    believe me, i don't think your cpu can handle 7200fps. just copying a file is much slower than that.
    so you might want to like 1 hour playback.

    and i think its better to decimate the frames, throwing it away, then fasten the fps using something like for avisynth assumefps()
     
  6. gmoyer

    gmoyer Member

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    Thank you for the replies. So how do they do something like with ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition where they show the build site condensed, or speed up, from 18 hours into 30 seconds? Is that editing/deleting frames or is it a supercomputer that can handle 64800fps (1944000frames in 30sec)?

    Thanks again,
    Grant
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2005
  7. turkey

    turkey Regular member

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    hey guys there is a perfectly viable solution here. Womble MPEG Video Wizard has a playback speed adjuster that can be set all the way up to 16x. from my calculations, at 16x, you could possibly get an 8hr video squeezed down to about 30 mins. after that you would encode it and if needed, run that encoded file through the speed adjuster again for the desired length.

    the speed adjustment works simply by removing frames. this is really not a problem cuz the human brain is absolutely incapable of processing 7200fps, so loosing a few frames doesn't hurt. plus if you ever watch sped up videos from Extreme Makeover or any time lapse film you will likely detect slight jumps where frames are missing, this is totally normal. Womble MPEG Video Wizard is worth a try either way. it can handle avi and mpeg files, which you can convert (using other programs) to any format for streaming over the net.

    and one more thing. trying to listen to the audio of a sped up video is just plain silly, so you would just strip out the audio altogether.
     
  8. TPFKAS

    TPFKAS Regular member

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    Sorry guys, but I miss the point of this 7200 fps... I assume we're talking about time lapse here, where you see something happening in 3 minutes that normally takes 8 hours.
    If you use an editing program to speed up the movie, it just gets rendered in 29.97fps (or 25 fps for PAL). New frames are created as an interpolation of original frames. I haven't checked if there is a limitation in Premiere in terms of % that it can speed up, but if there is you coul just speed up to the max, render it, load it in a new project and speed up again.
    The only question is what will be the final quality of the movie. One frame will be the result of an interpolation af about 150-200 frames, so all the movements in the movie should be veeerrrryyyy ssssllloooowww in order to get an acceptable result. ;-)
     
  9. celtic_d

    celtic_d Regular member

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    Something like:
    SelectEvery(40,0)
    assumefps(24)

    If you are using AVISynth and you had a 24fps source.
     
  10. shiroh

    shiroh Guest

    celtic_d here came up with a good solution.
     
  11. TPFKAS

    TPFKAS Regular member

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    Are you sure that this is the right solution? It will just paste one every so many original frames in a new file, which may create a very 'jumpy' result.
    I assume that if you take the Premiere route that it does interpolation. However, at this acceleration rate you may get some 'smearing' effects.
    Gmoyer, try both and let us know ;-)
     
  12. pfh

    pfh Guest

    Turkey- interesting point.
    If gmoyer were to first go thru the 8 hours of footage and cut out a lot of the redundant stuff then run the speed adjustment he might get there. More than a days work but it sounds simple enough esp. if he eliminates the audio.
     
  13. shiroh

    shiroh Guest

    of course it would be jumpy.

    is it ok for premiere to load 8 hours of footage.
    will it load all of it at once ?
    sorry i don't use premiere.

     
  14. turkey

    turkey Regular member

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    I agree, the picture could appear jumpy. but jumpyness is to be expected when frames are removed. think of it this way: speeding up video is like warping space-time, weird things happen...

    when time lapse is done correctly, the camera is held completly stationary and the event that is being recorded is moving very slow. if we assume for a moment that it was possible to watch this event when sped up to 7200fps our brains would only register movement over the course of a few seconds. our brains automatically skip over or "forget" periods of time in order to notice subtle movements. if the movement in the film is subtle enough, removing large numbers of frames would not be noticed at all. (BTW: I'm a Research Psychologist)

    practicallly speaking, squeezing 8 hours into 3 mins would mean removing a huge amount of frames and could therefore be noticable. if someone can confirm that Adobe Premier is indeed capable of speed adjustment, then i think gmoyer should get the trial version of either Premier or Womble MPEG Video Wizard and see what happens. i am sure with practice it will come out fine.
     
  15. celtic_d

    celtic_d Regular member

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    All the time lapse stuff that I have seen just looks like they decimated as above. You want to blur/average the 40 frames instead? I doubt that it would look better. You could also use ConvertFPS() multiple times if you wanted to blend.
     

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