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Shrink in ISO vs File mode

Discussion in 'DVDR' started by shark29, Feb 6, 2005.

  1. shark29

    shark29 Member

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    Hello,

    I am a former DVDXCopy user who is now starting to use Shrink. Using the guides on bbmayo's homepage, I have been converting files to ISO mode for buring with decrypter. However, I was wondering if there is a difference between ISO mode and file mode. DVDXCopy rips the files one at a time from the original disc, aka the actual VOB files, etc. Does ripping in file mode using Shrink do the same thing I guess? I should probably try it before asking. Also, does ripping to an ISO image sacrifice quality at all if compression is not used? Since, DVDXCopy creates a perfect 1 to 1 copy(not using compression) I wdidnt want to sacrifice quality. Thanks for any info!

    Shark
     
  2. larrylje

    larrylje Active member

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    DVD Decrypter has the options to rip the CD in FIle Mode AUDIO_TS fodler and VIDEO_TS folder or you can rip it to an ISO folder. I dont think there really is a diffrence between which way you do it. Its just the prefrence of the person doing the ripping. Now you can load File Mode into DVDShrink by clicking on open files, or you can laod the ISO by clicking Open Image in DVDShrink. Now after DVDShrink does its work it just depends on what prefrences you have set for the final output of the files. You can have DVDShrink make a Folder with Subfolders of Audio and Video and burn with Nero or you can make an image file and burn with Nero or Decrypter.

    As of you saying DVDXcopy makes a perfect copy that is wrong. If the DVD fits on a DVD5 disc then DVDXcopy wouldnt compress but if it is a DVD9 Disc DVDXcopy does compress the files if you want the DVD to fit on 1 disc. Other words you would have to use 2 disc with no compression if its a full backup of a DVD9
     
  3. brobear

    brobear Guest

    I'd just add that some programs don't use the ISO file. So a DVD ripped in ISO read mode with DVD Decrypter couldn't be used in DVDCopy3 or DVDXCopy without first being loaded in a drive emulator. I don't know of any programs that won't use the File Mode. An ISO file is just one huge file with all the individual files in it. In fact WinRar can open an ISO into the individual files. As mentioned, in a lot of cases the method is just a preference. However with some programs there is only a particular option. Quality should be the same if used properly. After all, the files being used are the same, just in a different format.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 6, 2005
  4. bazilla

    bazilla Regular member

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    just to add to what larrylje and brobear said,

    ISO's are [bold]file system[/bold] images. As such, they contain not merely the movie files (which you see in the VIDEO_TS) folder) but the file system information necessary to replicate the image on dvd. In effect, the only difference between ripping in ISO mode and file mode is that the latter rips only the movie files and not information regarding the dvd file system (UDF). Both, though, are ripping "the files one at a time from the original disk, aka the actual VOB files". Compression doesn't occur in the ripping process, regardless of whether you use ISO or file mode. Both modes give you binary copies of the original VOB files with whatever compression is present in the original VOB files. Additional compression occurs only if you have to shrink the files further to copy them to a single layer dvd.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2005
  5. brobear

    brobear Guest

    Bazilla
    I think there may be a slight error in your statement.
    That means the File mode includes no info regarding the file system and ISO does. (ISO is a file that contains full content of the disc, including every single track, directory, file and information about the structure of the disc - from the Glossary). Why then can you open an ISO folder and get the Audio_TS folder and the Video_TS folder with all the separate files using the WinRar archive tool. ISO is just a big image file with everything in it. File mode has everything broken into individual files. You can take either file setup and go the other way if you have the software. WinRar gives you file from ISO and DVD Shrink will produce ISO from files. And UDF is hardware based.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 7, 2005
  6. brobear

    brobear Guest

    BTW, UDF gets into recordable and RW media and is hardware based. Check out UDF and Mount Ranier in the Glossary, along with ISO and ISO 9660.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 7, 2005
  7. ScubaBud

    ScubaBud Regular member

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    If I may ask one more question. If we new for a fact that there would be no problems either way, either ISO or File mode, is there any real advantage to use one over the other or is this just a personal choice?

    I have also seen written from others a memory issue while using the ISO method.
     
  8. brobear

    brobear Guest

    Depending on the program doing the encoding, ISO can be more memory intensive. RB/CCE is a good example. Most of us using that app use files ripped in the File mode. Of course for editing the File mode makes things easy. Some programs can't use ISO files unless they're loaded in an emulator (virtual drive). I've used both formats and to me it is just a matter of choice and what is handiest for a particular program. Just about all programs handle files in the File mode, so over the past months I've started using files ripped in File mode almost all the time. I burn with Nero and CopyToDVD and the results have been excellent. I can't tell which of my backups were recorded in ISO or File format by just playing them. Quality is equal. So, to me it just appears mostly as a matter of choice with the exception of certain programs that work better with files. I haven't found one yet that has an advantage from using ISO. I've heard some people talk about playability and compatibility, but I've never run into any issues with my equipment, media, or any of the backups I've done.
     

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