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So what is the archivability of DVD/CD media?

Discussion in 'DVD±R media' started by summitboy, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. summitboy

    summitboy Member

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    I have an original DVD of The Outlaw Josey Wales that I have had for about five and a half years. I have probably watched it about three times. I got about half way through today when it started pixelating and breaking up like I have had some backup copies do especially on inferior media. We are being told that the archival properties of CDs and DVDs are supposed to be decades, I’ve even heard a hundred years mentioned. Now this was a print, not a backup were the signal is just written on the dye, yet it was basically unwatchable after just five years. As an aside, I stopped viewing and made a backup and the backup worked fine. (for now)

    So what is the archivability of DVD/CD media? This makes me real nervous when I think of the thousands of pictures I have stored on DVD. Mind you this is good media, Ritek G05 till they started having issues and now TYG03. I am wondering what others experience is and what other storage alternative we would have that will not break down.

    Anybody care to weigh in?
     
  2. Dunker

    Dunker Regular member

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    If it's really valuable, consider making two copies and putting them on good media. I like to split between TYG02 and Verbatim +Rs, ideally. I use the +Rs for working with and the -R TYG02 for archiving. Another idea, and this can be used in addition to making duplicate discs, is to use QuickPAR to create parity recovery volumes. At 20% recovery (that is, you can recover a disc that is 20% damaged/data missing), you can fit 5 discs-worth of recovery data onto one disc (assuming 4.7 gb discs). I feel it is best to store the PAR recovery files on a TY media and, again, this is best used IN ADDITION to making duplicate sets of discs.
     
  3. scorpNZ

    scorpNZ Active member

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    If you can remember at what section it was having trouble put it in the comps drive and see if it does it,seems strange your comp can read it to make a copy and still come out all right,in any case all is not lost most video stores have buffing machines and yes they work well
     
  4. JoeRyan

    JoeRyan Active member

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    Just because the picture started to pixelate does not mean that the disc is the cause. The player's mechanical apparatus and laser diode are also subject to deterioration over time, and the fact that you could make a backup is some indication that the disc is still legible in at least one drive.

    The weakness for regular DVDs is the bonding agent that is supposed to keep the two halves perfectly flat. As long as that adhesive remains intact, the DVD should last a very long time--much longer than the 30 years or so a storage/retrieval format lasts. Recordable DVDs have an additional Achilles' heel in that the dye slowly deteriorates over time allowing errors and jitter to increase. Using standard environmental testing procedures, engineers have found that good recordings on good discs should reach 39 years with 95% confidence (that means only about 5% will be illegible before 39 years) as long as the discs were stored below 78 degrees F. at about 50% relative humidity. Several discs lasted as long as 58 years under double-stress (heat/humidity) conditions.

    CD-Rs exceeded 100 years under the same conditions. To put things in perspective, the oldest analogue recordings on magnetic tape turned 70 years old last November. No one cared to attend the birthday party.
     

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