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soldering iron for d2c key

Discussion in 'Nintendo Wii / Wii U' started by duboy1, Dec 13, 2007.

  1. duboy1

    duboy1 Regular member

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    what type of soldering iron would be good for soldering the d2ckey since it is so close together. Also, where would be good to get it? Like would a little 20watt be good, and how big of a tip or what? Thanks!
     
  2. Menion

    Menion Regular member

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    I am really not trying to sound like a jerk at all, but if you dont know the answer to that I would suggest you dont even attempt it let a professional do that, The D2C Key is a huge feat and not for a novice, I myself wouldn't even attempt that chip. The only Soldering Iorns I have ever seen with that small of a tip with the power at the end are nearly 2 grand for a decent set-up, The wii is $250+ the installation from professionals is $75 dont take the chances of paying $500+ (but.. I myself wouldnt do anything above a 12 Watt Soldering Iron being that close to the IC.) if you do attempt it I truly wish you the best of luck and hopefully everything goes smoothly
     
  3. duboy1

    duboy1 Regular member

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    Haha alright. I mean, i soldered xbox's before but this definately looked tough... haha. Thanks though
     
  4. Joshewah

    Joshewah Regular member

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    I would never attempt an install that looks like this.

    There is not enough margin for error.


    [​IMG]

    Supposedly there is an 8 or 13 wire install for the D2Cs on the way. I forget the name of it but I'm sure a google search will turn it up.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2007
  5. XdjxedxdX

    XdjxedxdX Regular member

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    Holy crap is that whats involved with the d2ckey.Jeese glad io got the Nerd ta do it for me.
     
  6. MattGM

    MattGM Member

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    Yes, D2CKey is best left for professionals.

    There will be a D2CKey quick solder method coming soon with flexpcb.
     
  7. brido84

    brido84 Regular member

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    Still one hell of a job even using the flex pcb, I personally think it would require as great a level of skill to use this as a wire install. It does nothing but save you time as you don't have to route wires about. It still targeted at the people who can fit the d2ckey anyway. If you can't fit one with wires , you wouldn't be able to with the flex pcb either as the points are still the same.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2007
  8. simoriah

    simoriah Member

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    Wow.... Never saw a square D2CKey before... must be a development version.

    There are installs out there that are a LOT cleaner than what was posted, here. But, yeah... the install is a pain in the neck for someone that's not REAL handy with the proper tools. If you're not confident soldering 20 wires on 20 consecutive IC pins (that're about as close as you've ever seen before) then this install isn't for you.

    And as for having to ask what iron is best for this kind of work... "A good one with a really fine tip." The iron I've got is 50W but has adjustable temp, a 1/64" tip, etc. Add in some good 67/33 solder, a good flux, and a good magnifier (not NECESSARY but helps)... and you have the tools for the job. But maybe still not the skills.
     
  9. brido84

    brido84 Regular member

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    Hadn't noticed it was square, thats a new one to me.

    I think the original poster has already decided not to try it himself, but it's probably good to still have this buzzin round hopefully it will save some people allot of time and money.
     
  10. simoriah

    simoriah Member

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    Based on the wires connected to the bottom, I'm guessing this came right from the d2ckey guys' labs... still connected to a programmer for frequent updates to the code on the chip.

    Kinda cool to see an extra couple of pins hooked up. Makes me wonder why they're not needed, now.
     
  11. chaosdsr

    chaosdsr Member

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    I installed mine with little issue and a 20 dollar 25 watt solder iron from radio shack. This install takes some time but if you feel froggy jump! I have done 5 since my own system (which I used to test the install) and have had no issues. Waiting to test the PCB install on the board. Oh and the Extra wires are for checking and changing coding and are not needed for normal installs but depending on what Nintendo does may be required at a later date to update the chip. This chip itself is almost undectable because it is a hardware mod that just redirects info from the original chip and shuts off when originals are being used.
     
  12. 5couse

    5couse Member

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    Christ thats scary lol ive got one of those sitting on my desk at the minute waiting to be done. SCARY
     
  13. simoriah

    simoriah Member

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    It's not THAT scary... just take your time. Go slowly. And be prepared for a few hours (or more) your first time through.

    If you're not used to soldering, find the nastiest, smallest IC legs you can find and practice on those. That'll get you started on the kind of intricacy that the d2ckey requires.

    BUT PLEASE... practice, first. The install ain't easy.
     

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